Tuesday, February 20, 2018

21/02/2018: SmartFish Trade and Development Forum

Some 120 stakeholders from the small-scale sector (fish traders, processors, buyers, authorities & Others) from over 20 countries in Africa and the Indian Ocean Region will converge on Mauritius from the 15th to 17th March to participate in the largest Fish Trade & Development Forum for the small scale marine fisheries sector yet organised
 


The theme of the event is ‘Making money through sustainable fisheries’. The exhibition will showcase equipment, machinery, products from SmartFish beneficiaries, new technologies, potential for innovations, servicing the small-scale sector for processing, value addition, drying, packaging, labelling etc. Value chains for the octopus fisheries, shrimp fisheries, tuna fisheries, crab & sea cucumber fisheries etc., will be showcased.

This forum will target new avenues for market and trade development by promoting adapted technologies and investment opportunities.

The fisheries sector in Africa employs 12.3 million people. According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), the global fish trade is growing at a rate of five percent annually. The SmartFish Programme is the largest EU-funded fisheries programme in Africa, implemented by the Indian Ocean Commission.


For more information contact Erik on erik.hempel@hempelco.com or call +47 9084 1124

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

21/02/2018: Jérôme Le Friec appointed General Manager at the head of Diana Aqua

Since January 2018, Jérôme Le Friec has been appointed at the head of Diana Aqua, a global strategic growth segment for DIANA and the Symrise Group

Jérôme Le Friec's mission will be to define and implement the Aqua business strategy by developing, coordinating and managing the Aqua activity in accordance with Diana’s objectives. 


 
Jérôme Le Friec
Image credit: Diana Aqua
He will lead the growth and profitability increase of Diana Aqua, coordinating the different departments involved in the activity, through the development of functional solutions dedicated to the aquaculture market. He will explore and develop external strategic partnerships.

Jérôme has 24 years of international experience in animal nutrition industry and feed additives. He began his career with Timab, Roullier group where he spent 17 years. He then joined Olmix where he was a Managing Director for 6 years before taking the position of Deputy General Manager at Mixcience (Avril group) in 2016.

About Diana Aqua

Diana Aqua develops and delivers advanced natural and sustainable solutions for the aquaculture feed industry, enhancing the nutrition and health of farmed fish and shrimp and, indirectly, the consumers’ well-being. Valorising marine co-products, Diana Aqua acts as a responsible and trustworthy partner contributing to the sustainable growth of aquaculture industry, providing advanced functionalities to the aqua feed players while enhancing aqua farms performance. Diana Aqua is part of Diana, a division of Symrise AG and relies on a unique global network of scientific and technological experts, a team of 140 passionate employees and five industrial sites all over the world.


Visit the Diana Aqua website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

21/02/2018: Ground-breaking fish stunning technology

by Ace Aquatec

Innovation award winners Ace Aquatec revealed their incredible new technology at this year’s Aqua Nor 2017 event in Norway.

The technology renders fish unconscious before they even leave the water, decreasing fish stress levels and therefore offering a more human alternative to traditional mechanical stunners. 


 
Image credit: Ace Aquatec
A fish out of water
In traditional stunning systems there is a literal fish out of water problem. After taking the fish out of the water that they live and thrive in, they get pumped out of the water and then stunned by pneumatic, percussive or electric devices, often mechanical ones.

This can present many drawbacks, including;

• There are problems with fish that differ in size – some are not properly stunned.
• The fish is stressed, triggering cortisol to release into their body – which is turn lowers the quality of the filet.
• There is a significant limit to how many fish it is possible to stun in a given time – often one at a time.
• The systems are often mechanical – requiring spare parts and repairs.
• Mechanical systems are also prone to downtime.

Ace Aquatec has claimed that with their innovation they have found the solution to all of these problems. The company’s focus is no being directed onto fish welfare and the humane stunning and killing of the fish with the presentation of this new technology.

An unwanted compromise

Nathan Pyne-Carter, Executive Managing Director of Aquatec, who accepted the Innovation Award at AquaNor explains, “We saw that fish farmers had to compromise between efficiency and humane stunning. Our system stuns 100 percent of the fish every time. It also stuns them in the seawater – so they are not stressed before they are rendered unconscious. Some methods of slaughter cause fish to die over long periods of time – we wanted to improve this process for aquaculture and wild fishing vessels, for all species including crustaceans.”

What “no one else can offer”
There are other ‘stunning’ technologies on the market. However, as of yet, no one else can offer stunning before the fish is transported through the pump towards the processing line.

Typically electric stunners are used after the fish is already on a dry conveyor belt – on their way to be bled. By this time they have both suffered and been stressed.

It has taken the engineers at Ace Aquatec close to 10 years to perfect the electric current. Too much, and you damage the flesh. If you stun side to side you can create a current that transfers from fish to fish. Too low and the fish is not properly stunned.

Ace Aquatec can now show independent research studies that document both that there is no damage to the fish flesh or skin, and that the fish is 100 percent unconscious before bleeding and slaughtering.

Mr Pyne-Carter remarked, “We’re not worried about being copied for quite some time. This is precision work and finding the right settings and equipment is extremely hard.”


Read the full article, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Ottevanger Milling Engineers company profile



Ottevanger Milling Engineers is a leading European company in the design and manufacture of equipment and complete installations for the grain-processing and mixed-feed industries.

Food producers throughout the world use these installations to produce food for people and animals. In modern, well-equipped plants in Aalten and Moerkapelle (The Netherlands) Ottevanger's specialists use the latest technologies to design and manufacture a comprehensive range of products.

Computer-controlled plants – anywhere in the world – are provided with on-line technical support from these plants. In its design of any installation Ottevanger takes into account the strictest environmental regulations and safety requirements.

There are, for example, always adequate facilities for air purification as well as sound and heat insulation. A lot of attention is also devoted to hygiene through the use of stainless steel and special coatings.

Thanks to its expert knowledge and expertise, amassed throughout its over one hundred years' experience, Ottevanger is the ideal partner for the implementation of your project.

Visit the Ottevanger website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Monday, February 19, 2018

20/02/2018: Salmon thriving thanks to new anti-sea lice shields

Leading producer of responsibly-farmed salmon, Scottish Sea Farms, is seeing one of its current crops outperform all previous years following the introduction of new anti-sea lice shields.

The new shields are the latest in a series of proactive, preventative measures by the company to enhance the health and welfare of the salmon under its care.
  
www.scottishseafarms.com

Specially engineered to suit Scottish marine conditions, each shield consists of a permeable fabric that lets water and oxygen move freely into fish pens whilst keeping natural health threats out. This fabric fully encases the pen to a depth of 6m, providing a barrier against sea lice which are most commonly found in the first few metres below the water’s surface.

The new shields were first introduced at the company’s farm at Slocka, Ronas Voe on Shetland in May 2017. In the nine months since, sea lice levels have successfully remained below the Marine Scotland Code of Good Practice threshold, and the salmon are showing strong growth and biological performance.

Such has been the effectiveness of the shields that Scottish Sea Farms has now invested over £800,000 with two Scottish suppliers – William Milne Tarpaulins in Aberdeen and W&J Knox in Ayrshire – in order to roll-out similar protection to 11 of its other farms.

The company is also working with neighbouring salmon growers to synchronise use of the shields, as part of a farm management agreement for those same areas.

Jim Gallagher, Managing Director of Scottish Sea Farms, commented, “We strive, wherever possible, to replicate the natural conditions that salmon are known to thrive in. As any farmer will understand however, this comes with its own risks as the marine environment presents new challenges all the time. We are continually exploring and investing in new ways of dealing with these challenges, and it’s hugely encouraging to see positive early results such as these at our trial project in Shetland.” 

This latest advance is part of a wider £11.8m investment in 2017 by the company to enhance the health and welfare of its salmon – over 85 percent of which is being spent on non-medicinal approaches.

In terms of controlling the sea lice challenge specifically, key areas of investment include:

  • More than doubling the use of cleaner fish, so-called because they ‘clean’ salmon by eating any sea lice, in the last year – 76 percent of which are now from farmed origin, keeping the company on track to use farmed-only stocks by 2020
  • Developing a new net cleaning pressure pump to keep pens free from marine build-up, simultaneously enhancing fish health and welfare and increasing the effectiveness of cleaner fish
  • Ongoing investment to increase understanding of cleaner fish, with the insights gleaned being shared with the wider industry
  • Co-funding new Thermolicer technology that bathes salmon in such a way as to dislodge and catch sea lice, with up to 95 percent effectiveness.
 In turn, the need to administer medicines has significantly reduced, with six of the company’s farms requiring no sea lice interventions at all during 2017.

The company’s investment in health and welfare doesn’t stop there.

With the UN reporting that the last three years were the hottest ever on record, and Scotland’s rising sea temperatures resulting in new planktonic organisms that are potentially harmful to the health of fish gills, the company has also invested approximately £200,000 in state-of-the-art environmental data monitoring equipment, as well as over £260,000 on new underwater camera systems.

Ralph Bickerdike, Head of Fish Health and Welfare at Scottish Sea Farms, said, “Even a seemingly slight increase in sea water temperatures of 0.5 degrees can have an impact on the marine environment. This new data monitoring equipment is enabling real-time analysis of key markers such as salinity and oxygen concentration, helping us to make informed decisions to maintain high standards of welfare for the fish under our care.

“Complementing this, the new underwater cameras enable us to observe the fish within the pens and respond swiftly should there be any changes in their natural behaviour.”

Visit the Scottish Sea Farms website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

20/02/2018: US consumers want protein raised with the same natural health supplements humans use

Cargill survey indicates popularity of natural supplements to aid digestive health, animal wellbeing 

Millennials, ever interested in where and how their food is produced, want their protein to be raised with the same natural health supplements they would use themselves—and they are driving this trend among the general US consumer base.
 

www.cargill.com

Cargill’s latest Feed4Thought survey, which polled more than 1,000 people in the US in December 2017, found 62 percent of millennials want the protein they eat to be raised with the same health supplements used in humans, such as probiotics, plant extracts and essential oils. Consumers in general report they are three times more likely to prefer protein that were fed those natural feed additives to improve the animal’s digestive health and overall well-being.

“We’ve seen a rise in the popularity of digestive health supplements for humans, which is echoed in the demand for protein raised with natural supplements,” said Chuck Warta, president of Cargill Premix and Nutrition. “People want natural, wholesome and sustainable ingredients. In turn, they are increasingly seeking out protein options in line with their values and personal natural health routines.”

Additional results from the Feed4Thought survey include: 
• Probiotics were the most well-recognised natural supplement for animals (43 percent).
• Almost three-quarters (72 percent) of respondents were aware of the availability of natural health products to feed animals.
• More than 80 percent of respondents reported adjusting or supplementing their diet to achieve better gut health.

Investing in Natural Feed Additives 
Other consumer research confirms this trend, which is driven by rapidly increasing demand for quality animal products. A recent MarketsandMarket™ study projects the total probiotics animal feed market will reach about $5.07 billion by 2022, growing at a rate of nearly 8 percent per year. Meanwhile, a senior industry analyst from Nutrition Business Journal, said global supplement sales for humans will also grow steadily through 2020.

“It’s important for the animal agriculture community to remain in touch with food trends so that we can continue to provide the choices consumers demand,” said Hannah Thompson-Weeman, vice president of communications at the Animal Agriculture Alliance. “Just as human health supplement offerings expand and improve, so do the options to raise animals with natural supplements. Consumers can now find the meat, milk and eggs raised with the same natural health supplements they personally use.”

“Cargill is expanding its efforts in healthy, naturally supplemented protein,” Warta said. "We are doing that through our acquisition of Diamond V and equity investment in Delacon. These two global businesses are leading the way in the production of sustainable and wholesome food that consumers want.”

Iowa-based Diamond V produces natural immune support products for animal feed, contributing to an overall safer and more sustainable food supply. Austria-based Delacon makes phytogenic feed additives, which use ingredients like herbs, spices, and other plants to improve animal performance.

“Our mission is to develop products that are natural, research-proven solutions that help optimise animal health and productivity,” said Diamond V’s president, Jeff Cannon.

“Our technology works naturally with the biology of the animal to strengthen the immune system, which supports benefits beyond health and performance.”


Visit the Cargill website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

20/02/2018: Technology plays in aquaculture

by Philippe de Lapérouse, HighQuest Consulting

Since 1960, global demand for seafood has increased 3.2 percent annually, outpacing the one percent annual growth in the world’s population over the same period. Per capita consumption of seafood during this period has increased from 10 kg to over 20 kg today. 


 
Image credit: High Quest Consulting
Overall demand for seafood protein is driven by demand in developing markets, particularly in Asia where fish has historically been a traditional source of protein in the diet, and in developed markets, due to the trend toward healthy lifestyles.

Given the restrictions on wild catch fisheries due to depleting wild fish populations, production of fish and seafood protein in farmed systems has increased substantially over the past decade to address the increasing demand. The eight percent growth in aquaculture production since 2010 is dramatic compared to the growth in production of land-based food animals (poultry, swine, and cattle).

Norway’s salmon industry – A model for leveraging technology
To meet this growing demand, the aquaculture industry is investing in the development and adoption of new technologies that will dramatically transform how fish and seafood protein are produced sustainably.

The development of the Norwegian salmon industry is recognised as a model for how new technologies can be leveraged to meet growing demand. Starting as a small-scale industry in the 1960s, the Norwegian salmon industry has emerged over the past 50 years as a world-class producer of salmon, with operations extending from Scandinavia to Chile, Scotland, Canada, and the Faroe Islands, that together export over one million metric tonnes of salmon products annually. This success was built on innovations in breeding (genetics), management systems, health products, and novel technology for production systems.

Technology clusters in Norway have developed solutions for addressing the limitations of oxygen in production systems, feed distribution, and disease control and treatment to increase the scale and efficiency of production sites. The industry also has shifted from using wooden cages to the current industry standard of polyethylene (PE) cages in open water, and is now beginning to adopt hinged-steel cages.

Furthermore, new cage designs have allowed for the circumference of cages to increase from 60 metres to 160 metres, resulting in a tenfold increase in production capacity for raising salmon in a single site.

As the salmon sector has grown, investment in R&D and new technologies has not been limited to addressing production capacity issues but also has focused on enhancing biosecurity capabilities (reduction of bio-fouling), improving feeding technology (design of open water feeding barges managed by remote control), enhancing fish welfare (control of parasites), improving gentle fish handling, and ensuring environmental stewardship.

The industry has focused on integrating knowledge between three core areas: the physical equipment (design and materials) used to farm seafood; operating systems leveraged to produce seafood; and intelligent management systems employed for coordinating the entire production system.


Read the full article, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news