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Thursday, February 23, 2017

24/02/2017: SONGA now capable of offering four-star BAP shrimp

Congratulations to Ecuador’s SONGA (Sociedad Nacional de Galapagos C.A.), which is now eligible to offer four-star Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) shrimp, only the second company in Ecuador capable of doing so, the Global Aquaculture Alliance announced in late February

Four star is the highest designation in the BAP third-party certification program, signifying that a product originates from a BAP-certified feed mill, hatchery, farm and processing plant.

 
Image: Cooking etc.
SONGA’s shrimp processing plant, two of its farms (Lebama Farm and Naturisa Farm) and its hatchery (Macrobio Hatchery) recently attained BAP certification.

The company sources its feed from GISIS and IMPROSA feed mills in Ecuador, both of which are BAP-certified.

SONGA is one of the top four white shrimp producers in Ecuador. In 2015 and 2016, SONGA was the number one Ecuadorian exporter to mainland China, South Korea and the United States.

The company is well known and reliable in the global markets due to its prime quality, consistency and fair weights.

“The efforts of SONGA to differentiate itself by achieving the maximum level of third-party certification truly represent its responsible aquaculture practices. SONGA is one of the leading companies in a leading country committed to environmental and social responsibility. We appreciate very much SONGA´s support,” said Marcos Moya, manager of BAP Supply Development.

BAP is the world’s most comprehensive third-party certification program, with standards encompassing environmental responsibility, social responsibility, food safety, animal health and welfare and traceability.

Currently, there are 29 BAP-certified processing plants, farms, hatcheries and feed mills in Ecuador. Worldwide, there are more than 1,600 BAP-certified facilities.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Andritz company profile


ANDRITZ is a globally leading supplier of plants, equipment, and services for hydropower stations, the pulp and paper industry, the metalworking and steel industries, and for solid/liquid separation in the municipal and industrial sectors.

The publicly listed technology Group is headquartered in Graz, Austria, and has a staff of almost 25,000 employees. ANDRITZ operates over 250 sites worldwide.


Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

23/02/2017: Diana Aqua marks a new milestone in its sustainable development program

Diana Aqua was recently awarded the IFFO Global Standard for Responsible Supply, Chain of Custody (IFFO RS CoC) certification

This award fully supports Diana Aqua’s ambitions to become a leader for sustainable functional marine ingredients for the aquafeed and aquaculture sector.
 

www.aquativ-diana.com

A new milestone in Diana Aqua sustainable development based on a solid and long term partnership with TC UNION AGROTECH (IFFO RS)
Since 2010, Diana Aqua and TC Union Agrotech, a Thaï leader in producing and supply aqua-industrial by products, have joined forces in a long standing partnership with the common mission to valorise co-products into performing solutions.

Thanks to unique know-how and scientific expertise, Diana Aqua has developed a leading position to deliver traceable, responsibly sourced and standardised marine ingredients with high functional value to aqua feed and aquaculture industry players.

On January 10th 2017, Diana Aqua Thai subsidiary (SPF Diana Thailand), was awarded of the IFFO Global Standard for Responsible Supply, Chain of Custody (IFFO RS CoC) certification.

This certification recognises the full commitment of Diana Aqua of providing its partners and customers with responsibly sourced raw materials, pure and safe marine ingredients with full traceability back to their source.

It also reinforces it’s positioning as sustainable reference partner in functional marine ingredients for the aqua feed and aquaculture sector based on responsibly managed factories and supply-chains.

According to Paul Seguin, Asia Sales Director, “This certification marks our global and local commitment towards delivering trust to our customers and supporting their brands on the aqua feed markets. The pressure on natural marine resources has become an imperative for all players of the value chain. Our role is to find disruptive sustainable business models to keep on serving the growing industry of aquaculture without compromising the quality and the nutritional and healthy benefits of our products”. 


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

23/02/2017: Federal government declares fishery disaster for low Pink Salmon harvest in gulf of Alaska

Governor Bill Walker and Lt. Governor Byron Mallott welcomed news that the US Department of Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker accepted the state’s request for a disaster declaration on pink salmon harvests in the Gulf of Alaska last week

In accordance with Section 312 (a) of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Management and Conservation Act (MSA), the State of Alaska requested the federal government declare a fishery disaster for poor pink salmon runs across the Gulf region in 2016.

 
Image: USDA Forest Service Alaska Service
“The impacts of low pink salmon runs are being felt across the entire Gulf of Alaska,” said Governor Bill Walker.

“In addition to commercial fishermen and fish processors, those who sell fuel, tackle, supplies, groceries, and lodging are also struggling from the poor season. Local governments will also feel the burden on their economic base. We are pleased with this news from the US Department of Commerce, and we will work with the federal government going forward to address this issue. I thank all the legislators who tirelessly advocated for this declaration, especially Representative Louise Stutes for making the first request.”

Low pink salmon runs across the Gulf of Alaska led to a significant drop in 2016 harvest numbers. This declaration provides Congress with a basis to appropriate disaster relief funding for economic assistance to affected communities.

Should Congress appropriate relief funds, the State of Alaska would be required to match 25 percent of the amount authorised.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

23/02/2017: World’s future food security “in jeopardy” due to multiple challenges, report warns

Without additional efforts, the target of ending hunger by 2030 will not be met 22 February 2017, Rome - Mankind's future ability to feed itself is in jeopardy due to intensifying pressures on natural resources, mounting inequality, and the fallout from a changing climate, warns a new FAO report out today

Though very real and significant progress in reducing global hunger has been achieved over the past 30 years, "expanding food production and economic growth have often come at a heavy cost to the natural environment," says The Future of Food and Agriculture: Trends and Challenges.

"Almost one half of the forests that once covered the Earth are now gone. Groundwater sources are being depleted rapidly. Biodiversity has been deeply eroded," it notes.
 
 As a result, "planetary boundaries may well be surpassed, if current trends continue," cautions FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva in his introduction to the report.

By 2050 humanity's ranks will likely have grown to nearly 10 billion people.

In a scenario with moderate economic growth, this population increase will push up global demand for agricultural products by 50 percent over present levels projects The Future of Food and Agriculture, intensifying pressures on already-strained natural resources.

At the same time, greater numbers of people will be eating fewer cereals and larger amounts of meat, fruits, vegetables and processed food — a result of an ongoing global dietary transition that will further add to those pressures, driving more deforestation, land degradation, and greenhouse gas emissions.

Alongside these trends, the planet's changing climate will throw up additional hurdles. "Climate change will affect every aspect of food production," the report says. These include greater variability of precipitation and increases in the frequency of droughts and floods.

To reach zero hunger, we need to step up our efforts
The core question raised by today's FAO publication is whether, looking ahead, the world's agriculture and food systems are capable of sustainably meeting the needs of a burgeoning global population.

The short answer? Yes, the planet's food systems are capable of producing enough food to do so, and in a sustainable way, but unlocking that potential — and ensuring that all of humanity benefits — will require "major transformations."

Without a push to invest in and retool food systems, far too many people will still be hungry in 2030 — the year by which the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) agenda has targeted the eradication of chronic food insecurity and malnutrition, the report warns.

"Without additional efforts to promote pro-poor development, reduce inequalities and protect vulnerable people, more than 600 million people would still be undernourished in 2030," it says. In fact, the current rate of progress would not even be enough to eradicate hunger by 2050.

Where will our food come from? 

Given the limited scope for expanding agriculture's use of more land and water resources, the production increases needed to meet rising food demand will have to come mainly from improvements in productivity and resource-use efficiency.

However there are worrying signs that yield growth is levelling off for major crops. Since the 1990s, average increases in the yields of maize, rice, and wheat at the global level generally run just over 1 percent per annum, the report notes.

To tackle these and the other challenges outlined in the report, "business-as-usual" is not an option, The Future of Food and Agriculture argues. "Major transformations in agricultural systems, rural economies and natural resource management will be needed if we are to meet the multiple challenges before us and realise the full potential of food and agriculture to ensure a secure and healthy future for all people and the entire planet," it says.

"High-input, resource-intensive farming systems, which have caused massive deforestation, water scarcities, soil depletion and high levels of greenhouse gas emissions, cannot deliver sustainable food and agricultural production," adds the report.

More with less 
The core challenge is to produce more with less, while preserving and enhancing the livelihoods of small-scale and family farmers, and ensuring access to food by the most vulnerable.

For this, a twin-track approach is needed which combines investment in social protection, to immediately tackle undernourishment, and pro-poor investments in productive activities — especially agriculture and in rural economies — to sustainably increase income-earning opportunities of the poor.

The world will need to shift to more sustainable food systems which make more efficient use of land, water and other inputs and sharply reduce their use of fossil fuels, leading to a drastic cut of agricultural green-house gas emissions, greater conservation of biodiversity, and a reduction of waste.

This will necessitate more investment in agriculture and agrifood systems, as well as greater spending on research and development, the report says, to promote innovation, support sustainable production increases, and find better ways to cope with issues like water scarcity and climate change.

Along with boosting production and resilience, equally critical will be creating food supply chains that better connect farmers in low- and middle-income countries to urban markets — along with measures which ensure access for consumers to nutritious and safe food at affordable prices, such as such as pricing policies and social protection programs, it says.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

IDAH company profile



IDAH’s ultimate goal is to be world’s number one with customer satisfaction.
IDAH’s vision is to build on our solid traditional manufacturing roots and expand out to be a full-service solutions provider: offering value-added system designs and turnkey project consultation services.

Through this expansion, we hope to create an international platform where technology could be shared and integrated for the benefit of our customers.

By upholding the IDAH Spirit, the passionate team members of IDAH are committed to achieve this vision.

The IDAH Spirit
"Creativity, Honesty & Quality "

Creativity is what gave birth to IDAH in 1974 and consequently the birth of the feeds manufacturing industry in Asia.

Innovation through creativity is what has enabled us to be the industry driver from our inception until now. IDAH is committed and well positioned to lead the industry of tomorrow.

If creativity is the engine that has rapidly pushed IDAH forward; Honesty is what keeps us moving in the right direction.

 IDAH has been firmly grounded on the virtues of quality, honour, and accountability. Our main business is to safeguard the trust that customers have given us and be a dedicated upholder of the highest quality standard.

Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

22/02/2017: Nutritional solutions for better health and sustainable aquaculture production

Dr Alexandros Samartzis is the Senior Technical Service Manager for Evonik (SEA) Pte. Ltd. based in Singapore

The global aquaculture industry has undergone several transformations during the last decades, driven not only by health, nutritional and production challenges but also by consumer perceptions and market demands

The two main drivers are the rapidly increasing population and the growing demand for seafood.

 
Alexandros Samartzis 
As aquaculture gets more intensive in order to cope with the global market demand, exposure and susceptibility to disease challenges are also increasing.

In the particular case of the shrimp industry, since Litopenaeus vannamei was introduced to Asia and gradually replaced Panaeus monodon, the global shrimp production has reached new heights.

Through the years a number of diseases such as; infection myonecrosis virus, acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease and enterocytozoon hepatopenaei have caused a devastating reduction in production in most of the countries.

Therefore, the threat of disease is a reality that the farmers have learned to live with.

The global trend to restrict or ban the use of antibiotics in animal production, as well as the demand for more sustainable food production, has created the need for new management solutions and strategies to fight against the pathogens that the fish and shrimp are suffering from.

In this context natural growth promoters and health solutions started gaining more interest and a place in the feed formulations.


Read the full article HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news