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Monday, February 28, 2011

Animal reproduction research to transform industry

New biotechnologies that influence the sex ratio and fertility of production animals are set to not only dramatically boost the productivity and profitability of Australia’s cattle and aquaculture industries but also address significant sustainability and welfare issues.

Being able to produce more animals of the desirable sex to re-stock the herd, pond or sea cage has been a long-held goal of industry, as have cost effective and welfare-friendly ways to control unwanted animal pregnancies.

Thanks to new research being undertaken by an international partnership led by Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), these goals are set to become reality. According to CSIRO’s Food Futures Flagship Director Dr Bruce Lee, the new multi-million dollar, three-year project aims to develop:
  •  a vaccine to sterilise male and female cattle;
  •  better ways to breed female only Atlantic salmon, which are more productive than their male   counterparts;
  •  sterile female prawns which grow 30 percent faster than males.
The collaboration, involving CSIRO, The University of Queensland (UQ), The University of Newcastle, Simon Fraser University in Canada and Central Michigan University in the USA, brings together world-leading scientists to find solutions to these difficult problems. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Official endorsement for SELFDOTT reproduction of bluefin tuna project

The Ministry of Environment, Rural and Marine Affairs (MARM) and the Ministry of Agriculture and Water of Murcia will sign a cooperation agreement to support the SELFDOTT project (Self-sustained Aquaculture and Domestication of Bluefin Tuna), in order to reproduce captive bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) using aquaculture techniques.

This was announced by the head of the Secretary General of Marine Affairs, Alicia Villauriz. The signing of the agreement - coordinated by the Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO) - will take place next week. Involved in this project are 13 government institutions, research institutes and industry associations from France, Germany, Greece, Israel, Italy, Malta, Norway and Spain.

The official stressed that Murcia is a pioneer in the development of bluefin tuna aquaculture. Through the SELFDOTT project, researchers will attempt to complete the production cycle for tuna in order to avoid dependence on capture fisheries thanks to new research. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Aquaculture offers huge potential

Greenshell mussels, Pacific oyster and King Salmon dominate New Zealand's sea-based aquaculture industry but waiting in the wings are other species including kingfish and sea cucumber which may be farmed in the ocean and on land.

A kingfish farm is proposed on land near Katikati and a joint venture between Chinese aquaculture company Oriental Ocean and the Whakatohea Maori Trust Board will see extensive land and ocean aquaculture operations established at Opotiki, including growing sea cucumber.

It took adventurous pioneers to launch aquaculture in New Zealand, initially growing oysters and greenshell mussels, but before the early 1990s and the establishment of the Resource Management Act, it was mainly a cottage industry with individuals or small companies using their ingenuity and a lot of trial and error to produce commercial crops. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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January 2011 catfish feed deliveries down

Total catfish feed delivered in the United States during January 2011 was 1,121 tons, down 25 percent from January 2010 and down 66 per cent from the previous month. Foodsize catfish feed delivered totaled 1,045 tons, down 27 percent from the corresponding month a year ago. Feed delivered for fingerlings and broodfish totaled 76 tons, up 29 percent from the corresponding month a year ago.

January feed delivered to Alabama catfish growers for foodsize fish totaled 212 tons, down 46 percent from last year. Alabama accounted for 20 percent of the total foodsize catfish feed delivered to US farmers.

The other major States with catfish feed deliveries for foodsize fish in January and their comparison to the previous year were Arkansas with 52 tons, down 32 percent; Louisiana with 18 tons, up 157 percent; and Mississippi with 209 tons, down seven percent. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Exports of premium salmon reach new peak

Exports of Scotland’s premium salmon product have increased to record levels for the second year in succession. Supported by the Scottish Government and Scottish Development International (SDI), exports of Label Rouge Scottish Salmon have increased by seven percent, rising from 7,251 tonnes in 2009 to 7,743 tonnes in 2010. This follows a 19 percent increase in the previous year.

The Label Rouge accolade is awarded by the French Government to products of superior quality, particularly in relation to taste. Scottish salmon was the first non-French food to receive this accolade back in 1992.

Scott Landsburgh, chief executive of Scottish Quality Salmon, the promotional and management body for Label Rouge Scottish Salmon, said: “This is great news for producers of Label Rouge Scottish Salmon. The strong export trade has been built solidly on provenance, the product’s PGI status and premium taste and quality. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Friday, February 25, 2011

Climate change the most serious risk to aquaculture: study

A study conducted on the analysis of stakeholders’ and shrimp farmers’ perceptions in Vietnam’s Ca Mau and Bac Lieu provinces determined that they find climate changes the most serious risk. Small scale farmers and other stakeholders involved in shrimp aquaculture have been suffering the effects of climate changes via frequent extreme weather events.

The present study run by the Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA) showed that shrimp farmers perceived too much rain, high temperature, canal/river/sea level rise, irregular weather and storms as their most serious concerns regarding monetary losses.

The study also ranked the risks of the different climate changes in Ca Mau and Bac Lieu provinces, prioritising the gravity of each of the climate changes that the farmers identified. At the top came high temperature and irregular weather (involving factors such as temperature and rainfall), followed by excessive rain, sea level rise and storms. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.



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Cleanseas' tuna fingerling success

Cleanseas' tuna fingerlings have reached 34 days without the problems faced two years ago. The southern blue fin fingerlings are expected to go into sea cages in about three weeks if all continues to go well with its world-leading attempt to commercially breed the species. Spawning started on January 20 and has continued on and off since then with the oldest fingerlings transferred to nursery tanks yesterday.

Clean Seas managing director Clifford Ashby said the aim is to transfer them to the sea in mid-March. "In the event of unsuitable sea conditions and or temperatures, the company also has the option of continuing the grow-out phase in the new land-based Arno Bay nursery tank facility,'' Mr Ashby said."The fingerlings are eating kingfish larvae and are soon to be weaned onto man-made feeds.'' Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.


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Sea bass harvested from fresh water tanks at Saliyamangalam

Heard of marine fish culture in fresh water? The Marine Products Export Development Authority (MPEDA) has achieved this. A tonne of sea bass, purely a marine species, was harvested from fresh water tanks at Aqua Nova farm at Saliyamangalam village near Thanjavur on Thursday.

M.S.Shanmugham, District Collector, saw the harvest and appreciated MPEDA for achieving this. According to S.Kandan, Assistant Director (Aquaculture) MPEDA, two hectares of fresh water pond belonging to G.S.Samarasam was selected at Saliyamangalam for the purpose.

Around 4000 seabass fingerlings (6 c.m x 3.2 gram weight) produced at Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Aquaculture at Sirkazhi in Nagapattinam were stocked in the 2x2x3.2 meter cages put up in the pond and cultured by giving imported pellet feed. Within eleven months the fingerlings grew to 38 cm size fish with an average weight of 750 grams. "The growth is better than in sea water and there is no disease attack", Mr.Kandan said. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.


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USDA announces proposed FSIS catfish rule

The US Department Agriculture (USDA) has announced a proposed rule requiring inspection of catfish and catfish products by USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). USDA is proposing these regulations to implement provisions as required by the Food, Conservation and Energy Act of 2008, also known as the 2008 Farm Bill.

The 2008 Farm Bill amended the Federal Meat Inspection Act making catfish an amenable species under the Act, thereby requiring that all catfish undergo inspection by FSIS. In addition, the Secretary must take into account the conditions under which catfish are raised and transported to processing establishments as part of the new inspection program. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Macroalgae to grow on land

South Australian producers could one day be harvesting macroalgae in a multi-million dollar industry from land-based farms – and collecting carbon credits into the bargain.

SARDI, Flinders University and University of Adelaide scientists are collaborating with Abalone Investment Ltd, Adam & Amos Abalone Foods Pty Ltd, Coorong Aquaculture Pty Ltd, Marinova Pty Ltd, Penrice Soda Products Pty Ltd, PIRSA Fisheries & Aquaculture and Science to Manage Uncertainty to select the best species and explore farming options in a AU$2.3 million three-year project.

Funding of more than AU$1.14m has been provided by the Premier’s Science Research Fund, with additional cash and in-kind investment from the partners, and support through Marine Innovation South Australia (MISA).

The project aims to establish South Australia as the national leader in large-scale macroalgal aquaculture, scope potential new products from human food to nutraceuticals and abalone feed, and help local producers capture a slice of the annual AU$8 billion world wide industry. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Thursday, February 24, 2011

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This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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A Review: Tilapia Culture


 ISBN: 978-0851990149


In 2006 Professor A.-F.M. El-Sayed wrote Tilapia Culture, a comprehensive book on Tilapia. In the book he starts with an extensive history of tilapia culture right up-to modern day practices. He has been engaged in research and teaching activities in marine sciences, particularly, fish biology, fisheries and aquaculture, for 30 years.
He authored or co-authored over 100 peer-reviewed publications, in addition to four books. El-Sayed has participated in more than 40 local, regional and international conferences in fisheries and aquatic sciences as a keynote speaker, session chair, papers presenter or chairman/member of the organising committees.
He is also a member of the scientific committee for the International Master in Aquaculture program, which is hosted at the University of Las Palmas De Grand Canaria, Spain. He obtained his B.Sc. in Oceanography, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt, and M.Sc. in Fish biology, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt, and a Ph.D. in Aquaculture (Fish Nutrition), Michigan State University, USA.
In chapter one he give an historical account of tilapia, early aquaculture, global tilapia production and capture fisheries. He looks at major producers and the species that are cultured he also covers the major producers in Asia, Africa that produce cultured tilapia as well as South America, North America and the Caribbean.
In chapter two he deals with the basic biology and ecology of tilapia, looking at the taxonomy, body shape and external morphology as well as its geographical distribution and the factors affecting it. He also covers the habitat diversity the environmental conditions of the regions that tilapia are found in.
Chapter three covers environmental requirements, such as temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, ammonia and nitrates. He also looks at pH, photoperiod and water turbidity.
In chapters four he looks at semi-intensive culture, with an Overview of Pond Fertilization, inorganic and organic fertilizers. He also covers supplemental feeding, polyculture and integrated culture along with economic efficiency of integrated culture.
In chapter five he delves into the intensive culture area of tilapia production, looking at stocking densities along with cage culture and tank and raceway culture. As well as green-water tank culture, tilapia culture in recirculating systems, effluent treatment and management he also looks at tilapia production in aquaponic systems.
In later chapters of this book Professor El Sayed looks at nutrition and feeding, reproduction and seed production, stress and disease. He also covers harvesting, processing and economics and the role of tilapia culture in rural development along with recent technological innovations. The final chapter of this book deals solely with the environmental impacts that tilapia culture has had on the environment.
A superb and comprehensive book, Professor El Sayed has produced a complete guide to the understanding of tilapia culture that is well written and presented. In my opinion this is a valuable book; this book is for students, researchers and practitioners in aquaculture, as well as anyone with an interest in tilapia farming or fish farming in general. Definitely one to have in your bookcase.

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

 This book can be brought through Perendale Publishers book 

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North Dakota Soybean Council Sends Reps To Asia

“As a North Dakota soybean farmer, I found this overseas mission extremely rewarding,” said Brent Kohls, North Dakota Soybean Growers Association board member and soybean farmer from Mayville, ND.  “To see first-hand how U.S. soybeans and soybean products are converted to food, feed, and value-added products in the countries of Vietnam and Indonesia was extremely educational and beneficial.”

While in Vietnam and Indonesia, the North Dakota delegation had the opportunity to visit several feed mills, an aquaculture production farm, a large poultry company, and an international container terminal.  Vietnamese imports of soybean meal for animal and fish feed is currently at 2.8 million tons, making it Southeast Asia’s largest importer.  Vietnam has tripled its soybean imports since 2002 due to the demand of the pork, poultry, and aquaculture feed industries. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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No buyer for Tassal after Pacific Equity Partners offer is rejected

Shares in Tassal Group slumped today after Australia's biggest salmon farmer failed to find a buyer, following its rejection of a higher offer from private equity group Pacific Equity Partners.
Tassal last December appointed advisory firm Gresham to assist with its strategic review, after receiving an expression of interest from PEP for a potential offer of AU$1.80 - AU$1.90 a share, or up to AU$278 million.

Despite receiving an updated proposal from an unnamed party, to potentially acquire a controlling interest in Tassal at AU$1.90 per share cash, the Tasmanian firm today stayed its course that the price “significantly undervalues” the company. PEP is understood to have made the updated offer. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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How fisheries can gain from the lessons of sustainable food

As agriculture and energy production have made strides toward becoming more sustainable, the world’s fisheries have lagged behind. But restoring our beleaguered oceans to health will require an emphasis on diversification and conservation and a more sensible mix of fishing practices.

In The Dark, Blue Sea, Lord Byron famously stated, “Man marks the earth with ruin, his control stops with the shore.” That in 1812 the land side of the shore was already being compromised was not in doubt. But two subsequent centuries of misuse have demonstrated just how mistaken he was about the inviolability of the oceans. Man’s control beyond the shore today is not complete, but it is profound.

The sea’s noteworthy denizens its finfish and shellfish, always major food sources have felt this control through over-harvesting and habitat destruction, so that today many species are in sharp decline or at perilous levels. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Catfish processing down 12 percent from last year

US - Farm-raised catfish processed during January 2011 totaled 35.1 million pounds round weight, down 12 percent from January 2010. The average price paid to producers was 93.1 cents per pound for January 2011, up 7.0 cents from last month and 16.7 cents above a year ago.

Net pounds of processed fish sold during January 2011 totaled 18.2 million pounds, down six percent from the comparable month in 2010. Sales of fresh fish, at 6.32 million pounds, were down 11 percent from January 2010 and represented 35 percent of total sales. Frozen fish sales, at 11.9 million pounds, were down four percent from a year ago and accounted for the remaining 65 percent of total fish sales.

Sales of whole fish represented 17 percent of the total fish sold, fillets accounted for 60 percent, and the remaining 23 percent were mostly steaks, nuggets, and value added products. The total end of the month inventory decreased 10 percent from last month and was down 20 percent from a year ago.  Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Improving the physical quality of fish feed

Norway - Julia Wolska of Skretting Aquaculture Research Centre (ARC) has started a PhD thesis that may contribute to the development of a new generation of feed pellets from Skretting. The expectations from a modern fish feed are many. The feed should have the required nutritional profile, good digestibility and be attractive to the fish.

In addition, the physical quality of the pellets is of vital importance to the farmers. The pellet should not crumble or release fat and must withstand storage and have the proper sinking rate. The growing use of vegetable raw materials makes it increasingly challenging to meet all these requirements at once and there is a need for new research in this area. Another reason for this work is that demands for physical quality are changing, due to factors including changing logistics, longer feeding tubes at the customer and new markets. Read more ...


This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Tilapia 'the zucchini of fish'

Mark McNaughton shakes a handful of pellets across the dark water and watches it start to roil. The placid surface hiding hundreds of sleek tilapia explodes with a slap and splatter. Almost as quickly, the fish slip back down to the bottom of the tank; only the paler ones remain visible, ghostlike under the water.

Here, in a converted hog barn surrounded by acres of snow-covered grain fields, McNaughton and his family raise tens of thousands of the freshwater fish before shipping them live to stores in Calgary and Edmonton. It's unexpected, the idea of raising fish on the bald prairie, but it's not as unusual as it once was, says McNaughton, who also heads up the Alberta Aquaculture Association. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Hjaltland hatchery approved

A multi-million pound salmon hatchery in Shetland was given the green light by local planners on Wednesday morning. Work to convert and extend the existing hatchery building at Girlsta will commence as early as April, according to Hjaltland Hatcheries, a subsidiary of Grieg Hjaltland Seafood, Shetland’s largest salmon producer.

Shetland Islands Council’s planning board unanimously granted planning permission despite some concern for a disused lime kiln, which was described as in poor condition and led to an objection by Shetland Amenity Trust. Board chairman Frank Robertson, who is a trustee of SAT, left the meeting during the debate.

The meeting heard that the developer had agreed to a number of preservation measures that would help access to the historic lime kiln. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Omega Protein hits new 52-week high at US$11.25

Shares of Omega Protein Co. (OME) hit a new 52-week high on Tuesday. The stock traded as high as US$11.25 (UK£6.934) during mid-day trading and last traded at US$11.19 (UK£6.897). The stock previously closed at US$11.05 (UK£6.811). On a related note, analysts at Zacks Investment Research upgraded shares of Omega Protein Co from an “underperform” rating to a “neutral” rating in a research note to investors on January 31st.

Omega Protein Corporation (Omega) is a processor, marketer and distributor of fish meal and fish oil products in the United States. The Company produces and sells a variety of protein and oil products derived from menhaden, a species of wild herring-like fish found along the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coasts.

The fish are not genetically modified or enhanced. The Company processes several grades of fish meal, as well as fish oil and fish solubles. The Company's fish meal products are primarily used as a protein ingredient in animal feed for swine, cattle, aquaculture and household pets. Fish oil is utilised for animal and aquaculture feeds, industrial applications, additives to human food products, and as dietary supplements. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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DFO scientists suggest the wild salmon stocks could be harmed

There's a risk Canadian fish stocks could be harmed if the world's first genetically engineered salmon is approved for commercialisation, federal scientists suggest. Internal records obtained by Postmedia News also indicate experts from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans are concerned about "limited" and possibly "constrained" regulatory powers around the approvals for GE fish.

The analysis, from senior scientists specializing in biotechnology and aquaculture, comes as a company called AquaBounty Technologies works to bring GE salmon to the dinner plate.

Hoping to get approval in the United States to sell the first genetically engineered fish that people can eat, the company cleared an important hurdle in August, when the US Food and Drug Administration's preliminary analysis concluded that the salmon, engineered in Atlantic Canada to grow twice as fast as normal fish, are safe to eat and not expected to have a significant impact on the environment. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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United States seafood exports to reach $2.3 billion

With significant rise in shrimp exports particularly to US, the country's seafood exports during the current fiscal year is likely to reach US$2.3 billion (UK£1.418 billion), having crossed US$2 billion (UK£1,233 billion) in the first three quarters of 2010-11.

Export realisations have achieved a major milestone in spite of several negative factors including recession and the weakening of Euro because of political unrest in some countries, Marine Exports Product Development Authority (MPEDA) sources said. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Changing aquaculture scene in red river delta, Vietnam

Major changes are taking place in two traditional integrated aquaculture systems, the VAC and wastewater-fed aquaculture in the Red River Delta, Vietnam, especially in peri-urban Hanoi and adjacent provinces, writes Peter Edwards, for the Network of Aquaculture Centres in the Asia-Pacific.

Traditional aquaculture is integrated with other human activity systems as these provided the only available sources of nutritional inputs for farmed aquatic organisms in the past. However, farmers are intensifying to earn more money through introduction of new or improved higher value species, sometimes raised in monoculture, and increasing integration with feedlot livestock and/or using pelleted feed. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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The fish feed story

There have been substantial technical advances in recent years which have dramatically changed the use of fish meal and the efficiency of feeding. Marine Harvest, the worlds biggest salmon producer, has now explained some of the major factors behind the fish feed story and the use of fish meal.

One aspect of the sustainability of salmon aquaculture is the quantity of wild fish-meal and fish oil within the feed supplies. In the 1990’s wild fish components of feeds were as high as 80 percent. Modern feeds now contain only about 15 percent of fish-meal and 15 percent of fish oil. this is due to the extensive research into fish nutrition and commercial feeds.

During the last 20 years salmon farmers have gradually replaced raw marine material for vegetable raw material, while sustaining the health benefits and quality of farmed salmon. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Use of alien species in aquaculture

European Union - The European Council has amended regulation (EC) No 708/2007 concerning the use of alien and locally absent species in aquaculture. This proposal was previously adopted by the European Parliament (61/1/10).

This regulation establishes a framework governing aquaculture practices in relation to alien and locally absent species to assess and minimise the possible impact on biodiversity of these species and any associated non-target species on aquatic habitats. The regulation includes provisions for the establishment of a permit system at national level. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Norway’s AKVA group continue with reduced losses for 2010

Norwegian fish farm equipment and services company, AKVA Group has reported continued, but slightly reduced losses for quarter 4 and the full year 2010. Operating revenue for the AKVA group in the 4th quarter of 2010 was 195.9 MNOK (UK£21 million) versus 142.9 MNOK in Q4 2009. Operating revenue for the full year 2010 was 742.5 MNOK (UK£80 million) versus 599.3 MNOK in 2009.

Operating profit was -8.7 MNOK (-UK£940k) in 4Q compared to -16.1 MNOK in 4Q last year. The company said the result was negatively affected by increased costs on recirculation projects of which the major part related to two recirculation projects in Norway. Both projects are in the final stages and are operating. Profit before tax for the full year 2010 was -50.9 MNOK (-52.0 in 2009) after allowing for net financial items of -9.9 MNOK (-9.6). Net loss was -37.6 MNOK (-39.1 in 2009). Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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South Australia to benefit from aquaculture

Aquaculture is a jewel in the crown of South Australian (SA) industries and its oysters, mussels and abalone are set to drive growth. Coffin Bay oysters, tuna from Port Lincoln, abalone and yellowtail kingfish are on restaurant tables around the world and that's paying economic dividends for SA, state Fisheries Minister Michael O'Brien says.

"With world-wide demand for clean-green sustainable seafood on the rise, this is an opportune time for SA's aquaculture industry to position itself to capitalise on growing global demand," the minister told a business breakfast on Tuesday. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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State requires shoreline programs to incorporate geoduck farming standards

Commercial geoduck farms operating on public and private beaches will come under increased scrutiny as the result of new rules adopted by the Washington Department of Ecology. The rules direct cities and counties to incorporate new aquaculture standards as they update their local shoreline master programs. In Kitsap County, such updates are taking place at the county level as well as in all four incorporated cities.

"Aquaculture should not be permitted in areas where it would result in a net loss of ecological functions, adversely impact eelgrass and macroalgae, or significantly conflict with navigation and other water-dependent uses," states the rule adopted by Ecology. Geoduck farms typically protect tiny geoduck clams by growing them inside vertical plastic pipes embedded in the beach. The new rules specifically state that such farms should be allowed only in areas where significant clearing or grading is unnecessary. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Researchers find uses for fish waste

The Fishery Industrial Technology Center (FITC) Agricultural Research Service seafood processing byproducts project has resulted in a number of ways to use fish waste products, and is studying even more uses. The project, which has been going on for 11 years, was started with one goal: finding out how to convert fish processing waste into aquaculture feed ingredients.

“This was the area where there was the greatest utility for the products that we could easily make,” FITC professor Scott Smiley said. Fish processing byproducts or waste are the parts left over after food portions are removed. The major waste components are heads, frames (what’s left of the body when fillets are cut off), viscera (guts including testes, ovaries and livers) and skins.

Smiley said Alaska harvested 2,090,379 tons of fish in 2008. Much of that results in waste. For example, about 35 percent of fish weight for landed salmon that is canned becomes waste. Only 65 percent goes into the can. Pollock surimi results in 80 percent of the product becoming waste. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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RUSVM begins marine lab research

Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine’s (RUSVM), faculty member, Dr Esteban Soto, assistant professor of Bacteriology, has recently introduced an aqua animal laboratory to the campus. The new marine lab located below the campus Auditorium is home to approximately thirty aquariums where Soto and his team two student volunteers and two RUSVM laboratory staff will be exploring bacterial diseases in tilapia and other warm-water fish species.

Dr Soto and his research team has just started two new projects, one focused on the pathogenesis and tissue distribution of Francisella asiatica (a warm-water bacteria) in tilapia fingerlings (weight of 10-20 milligrams) and the second focused on the effects of temperature and salt concentration on Francisella asiatica infections in tilapia nilotica (Oreochromis niloticus).

Ultimately, the research team will be reviewing bacterial infections in tilapia and trying to understand what prohibits and inhibits the infectious capacity of these new bacteria in the fish host. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Monday, February 21, 2011

Bangladesh farmers fatten crabs on polluted land

They are pale, small and have very sharp claws but the tiny crabs found in local bazaars in Bangladesh are in big demand. In fact farmers cannot seem to get enough of them. In the south-west of the country, where swathes of farmland are submerged in salty water, many people have taken up crab farming after struggling to grow rice.

The financial returns are so good that some farmers are contemplating carrying on with crab-farming even if their land becomes suitable for growing rice and other crops one day. Fattening crabs is becoming the profession of choice for unemployed farmers such as Mujib. He switched to crab-farming after his land was flooded by a tidal surge which followed Cyclone Aila in May 2009.

"We had to move to temporary shelters on the road because water came into our home," says Mujib, who like many local people uses only one name. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Investigating Ostreid Herpesvirus-1 µ Variant in New South Wales

The New South Wales Department of Industry and Investment continues to investigate a syndrome of mortality in Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas), detected in the Georges River estuary and Botany Bay, New South Wales.

Formal controls remain in place on the movement of oysters and oyster farming equipment from the Georges River and Botany Bay. There are also restrictions in place on the recreational take of oysters from the affected area. Laboratory testing found Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) genetic material in association with the affected Pacific oysters; however, a causative role of this virus has not been established. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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The relevance of sea lice, toxins and fish still debated

In Mr. Werring's effort to find discrepancy, he succeeds only in misinterpreting statements and misrepresenting a very good academic text. As I said in my letter, B.C.'s salmon farming industry is not subsidised by the government. While there are some research partnerships into innovation that receive direct targeted funding, companies here support themselves through their regular operations.

The Aquaculture Controversy in Canada, UBC Press 2010, lays that out clearly - showing that federal funding is directed to research and development and B.C. specific funds are focused on shellfish, first nations and research. Perhaps Mr. Werring didn't understand that the book as referenced in the title - refers to all aquaculture in Canada, while I represent finfish aquaculture in B.C.

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Looking at health controls of aquaculture animals

The UK has a satisfactory system for prevention, control and eradication of aquatic animal diseases in accordance with requirements on aquatic animal health laid down in Directive 2006/88/EC, concludes a report by the Food and Veterinary Office (FVO).

The report's objective was to assess the implementation of national measures, aimed at the control of animal health requirements for aquaculture animals and products thereof, and on the prevention and control of certain diseases in aquatic animals, in accordance with EU regulations. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Out with tuna, in with sardines – a recipe for saving the seas

The world's oceans would be a better place for wildlife if people shifted from eating large, predatory fish such as tuna and cod to smaller, "grazing" fish such as anchovies and sardines, a major scientific study has found.

Fish at the top of the marine food chain have been the favourite species for the dining table for decades but overfishing has led to a catastrophic decline, scientists said. The number of predatory fish such as tuna, cod, swordfish and groupers has fallen by two-thirds over the past 100 years; 54 percent of this decline is thought to have occurred in the past 40 years, they said. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Inclusion of natural antioxidants in aquaculture feed to be assessed

The Dibaq Group, along with a further five companies and two technology centers in the Autonomous Community of Castilla and Leon, will participate in a project for the use of natural antioxidants in animal nutrition. Dibaq's main objective is to include these natural antioxidants in the groups two business lines: aquaculture and pet feed.

"The use of natural antioxidants is of great interest for the animal nutrition sector as their is consumer demand to replace the synthetic antioxidants. The main cause is the reassessment of the physical and chemical properties of synthetic food and the approach of animal feed with functional properties," explained the Segovian company.

The Project for Regional Strategic Sectors (Primer) entitled 'Design-Based Ingredients for Natural Antioxidants and a Study Over Behavior in Various Food Matrices (Diana)', has a budget of around EUR 3.8 million and will be overseen by the Association of Food Biotechnology of Castilla and Leon (Vivartis). Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Friday, February 18, 2011

Catherine Shortall joins the sales team at Perendale Publishers


“I am delighted to be joining Perendale Publishers as the newly appointed International Marketing Manager,” says Catherine Shortall.
“With my extensive background in sales and event management, I hope to make a positive change within the company as it expands as a leading publisher in the grain, flour, feed milling and aquaculture publications industry,” she says.
Miss Shortall will lead a dynamic sales team in a company that is adopting new ways of disseminating technical information to those who need it. She has worked in marketing and event management since 2005 and brings valuable experience that will compliment the company’s sales team based in Cheltenham, UK.
“Magazine publishing is changing in all sectors as the digital landscape re-shapes itself,” says Perendale’s owner/publisher Roger Gilbert.
“In trade publishing, we must adopt to the new ways our readers expect to find and use information. By strengthening our marketing department with the addition of Catherine, Perendale Publishers will deliver better services to its loyal readers and advertising clients alike.
“We were innovative leaders in our field in 1891 when our first magazine was launched and we are innovative leaders today as we adapt to the digital era in the 21st Century,” he says.
Catherine adds, “2011 looks to be an exciting and equally progressive year for us within the industry. My aim and objective is to move forward our sales team and produce dynamic results which will optimally create a beneficial platform from which we can develop new products and services for 2012.”
Perendale Publishers publishes Grain and Feed Milling Technology, International Aquafeed and the International Milling Directory. It has recently launched a new book review service, reviewing key agriculture and aquaculture titles for it readers.

More information:
Perendale Publishers Limited
7 St George’s Terrace, St James’ Square
Cheltenham, Glos GL50 3PT
UK
Tel: +44 1242 267700
Email: enquiries@perendale.co.uk
Website: www.perendale.co.uk
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Review: Handbook of Fish Biology and Fisheries Volume 1


 


ISBN 0632054123
 
In this first volume of the Handbook of Fish Biology and Fisheries (2002), edited by Paul J.B. Hart and John D. Reynolds the main aim is to bring together the study of fish biology with the study of fisheries.
 
This book is split into four sections: part one is biodiversity; part two production and population structure; part three is fish as predators and prey and part four is fish in ecosystems.
 
Chapter one looks at banishing ignorance. Underpinning fisheries with basic biology, in this chapter we look at global fisheries and the quest for knowledge. It covers all sections of the book as an introduction to the chapters the book as a brief introduction to each section.
 
Part one: Biodiversity in this section there are two chapters written by A.G. Gill and R.D. Mooi it cover phylogeny and systematics of fishes and an historical biogeography of fishes. The second chapter deals with phylogenetic methods and classification along with fish diversity and phylogeny. The third chapter looks at concepts and methods along with the distribution, faunal composition and historical biogeography by region.
 
Part two: Population and Population Structure in this part of the book there are seven chapters written by a number of authors. Chapter four looks at the physiology of living water. Chapter five, deals with environmental factors and rates of development and growth. Chapter six covers recruitment, understanding of density dependence in fish population. Chapters seven and eight looks at the life histories of fish and migration. Chapter nine covers the genetic of fish populations, chapter 10 deals with the behavioral ecology of reproduction in fish.
 
Part three: Fish as Predators and prey with three chapters dealing with fish foraging and habitat choice, feeding ecology of piscivorous fishes and fish as prey.
 
Part four: Fish in Ecosystems has four chapters dealing with trophic ecology and the structure of marine food web. It also covers community ecology of freshwater fishes and comparative ecology of marine fish communities and the interactions between fish, parasites and disease.
 
This is a well-written and comprehensive book dealing with complex interactions between fish and the environment it live in whether it be freshwater or marine. It looks at the ecosystem and how that can affect the fish’s life. This volume with many contributing authors has been well edited by J.B. Hart and John D. Reynolds. Very suitable for students and teacher alike but in my opinion a worthy book for anyone with a deep interest in fisheries. A must have book for any fisheries or marine scientist.
 
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VIV Asia 2011 to showcase world-class livestock technology

VIV Asia  2011, Asia’s largest livestock technology exhibition, is ready to showcase world-class technology to Thailand and also to Asian livestock producers during  March 9-11, 2011 at BITEC, Bangkok, Thailand. The show organiser, NCC Exhibition Organizer Co, Ltd, said that the show will feature 650 leading companies offering the latest livestock technology and solutions to 22,000 industry professionals from 94 countries.

Ms. Ladda Mongkolchaivivat, General Manager, N.C.C. Exhibition Organiser Co., Ltd., (NEO) said that “VIV Asia 2011, which is the 10th edition, will be the biggest show in VIV Asia’s 20-year history Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Facilitating toxic pesticide use on salmon farms

Canada - Despite mounting public concern over the impact of aquaculture pesticides on the marine environment, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) is in the process of developing regulations that will facilitate and enable the ongoing use of eco-toxic pesticides in the open water by the salmon aquaculture industry.

DFO’s proposed “Pathogen and Pest Treatment” regulation would undermine the Fisheries Act, which prohibits the dumping of toxic substance into fish bearing waters, effectively exempting salmon farmers from legislation designed to protect the marine environment and Canada’s fisheries. Indeed, DFO is tasked to oversee the very Act it threatens to weaken with these new regulations.

Today 20 groups, representing tens of thousands of Canadians, have sent a joint letter to Prime Minister Stephen Harper urging him to protect the marine environment and coastal communities by halting progress in the development of these regulations. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Sea cucumber aquaculture to deliver real benefits

Stocks of high-value sea cucumber species have been chronically over-exploited throughout the Asia-Pacific region, as elsewhere in the world. They are in great demand, not only for food but also for their reported medicinal and supposed aphrodisiac qualities, particularly among the Chinese.

Collected by divers in deep water and by women and children in the shallows, sea cucumbers are dried before being sold to traders. The market price for dried sea cucumber can top AU$200 a kilo, which makes them an important source of cash income for many poor and remote coastal communities throughout the Asia-Pacific region.

While better overall fisheries management is needed, for a small number of species, farming in ponds and sea-ranching promise to boost production, thereby taking the pressure off wild stocks so their numbers can be restored. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Cermaq enters feed production in Vietnam

Cermaq has signed a joint venture agreement with the local partner, Anova Corporation, in Vietnam. Through its feed operations, EWOS, Cermaq is entering operations in the Vietnamese feed market.

Through acquisition of shares and a targeted emission, Cermaq has obtained 51 percent of the shares in the joint venture company. Cermaq will control the Board of Directors and the management team. Mr Rune Vamråk, supply chain director of the Norwegian company EWOS AS, is appointed as general manager for the company.

By this agreement EWOS enters the feed market for farmed Pangasius. The broad competence the company has within salmonids can be successfully transferred to Pangasius, a white fish that has enjoyed a tremendous market growth in Europe and the US over the last decade. Pangasius eats feed made mainly from plants, and can supply significant volumes of animal protein to the global food market. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Trialling ocean temperature forecasts for fish farms

Marine scientists are trialling the first near-shore water temperature forecasts to assist Australia’s aquaculture farm managers contending with rising ocean temperatures. While land farmers have used seasonal forecasting for nearly a decade, marine farmers in south-east Australia  have sought the technology for a region identified as a climate change 'hot-spot', with rates of ocean warming up to four times the global average.

CSIRO Climate Adaptation Flagship scientist, Dr. Alistair Hobday, said the project, funded through the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, is a response to requests by Tasmania's four major salmon companies for short-term ocean forecasts for their farm sites. "Marine farms in this region, particularly south-east Tasmania, want to use all available resources to ensure proper planning and response measures are in place to combat against the warmer summer months which can have adverse effects on fish performance," Dr. Hobday said. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Tecumseh research firm works to sustain fish populations through farming

Matt Osburn has been a fisherman all his life. When his long-time friend, Kent Herrick, asked him to manage the Aquaculture Research Corporation facility at 105 E. Russell Road, he was happy to accept. Osburn also works as an EMT with the Tecumseh Fire Department. “Kent saw a need for this, and obviously he isn’t able to be on-site every day,” said Osburn.

The nonprofit Aquaculture Research Corporation, funded by the Herrick Foundation, has been growing through its first three-and-a-half years with additional support in the research venture through such institutions as the University of Michigan, Michigan State University, the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, the Toledo Zoo, and the Michigan Aquaculture Association.

The ultimate goal is to raise healthy, sustainable, homegrown seafood and make it available to restaurants, grocery stores and individuals. Kenneth Herrick once kept an automobile collection in the large pole barn next to the fire station, but it has been renovated so it could be a sanitary facility to grow yellow perch in tanks. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Thursday, February 17, 2011

2010 A "Transformational" year for Scottish salmon

The Scottish Salmon Company has announced strong Q4 results to complete a record year as the Company continues to capitalise on a favourable market for premium Scottish salmon. The company reported profits before interest and tax of UK£5.6m for Q4 2010 (Q4 2009: UK£5.1m) and UK£22.5m for the year compared to UK£11.1m for 2009 (figures before fair value adjustment for biomass).

Turnover for the Q4 period increased to UK£29.2m (2009: UK£22.9m), pushing revenues for the year to UK£92.4m (2009: UK£64.6m) with harvest volumes exceeding previous estimates at 24,516 tonnes. The market has remained strong throughout the year and the Company said that continuous investment to produce a high quality salmon product in response to customer demand underpinned its solid performance.

The Scottish Salmon Company, a principal player in the Scottish aquaculture industry responsible for approximately 20 percent of salmon production, is seeking to build a distinct brand and secure long-term market relationships which will continue to maximise premium price opportunities for Scottish salmon. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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