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Tuesday, September 30, 2014

30/09/2014: Images of China's floating cities and seafood prodcution

Astonishing images of the huge floating cities that have sprung up to service China's £25billion fish farming industry have emerged.
 
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2773835/The-incredible-floating-cities-China-Entire-bays-covered-wooden-homes-provide-two-thirds-world-s-seafood.html

The pictures - taken in Luoyuan Bay, in south-eastern China's Fujian province - show a mass of wooden homes and huts floating far out into the sea covering almost the entire bay.


Beneath them are a network of lines, cages and nets containing everything from crabs and lobster to scallops and carp and even seaweed.


See them HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

GePro - International Aquafeed 1404


GePro Gefluegel-Protein Vertriebs- gesellschaft mbH & Co. KG is a group company of PHW, one of the largest producers of poultry products in Europe. As a member of PHW, GePro is part of a completely integrated poultry production. With the state of the art production systems, our products are of extremely high quality and are regarded as benchmarks in the industry. The entire process is under strict veterinarian control leading to consistent flawless quality and great value proposition for our customers.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

30/09/2014: Biorigin at Fenacam - the Shrimp Farming Event in Brazil

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For the third consecutive year, Biorigin will be present at the most important shrimp farming and aquaculture fair in Brazil, Fenacam – the National Shrimp Fair, which will take place from the November 10 to 13, 2014 in Fortaleza, in the state of Ceara.

During the event (at its stand number 160), Biorigin will be presenting natural ingredient solutions indicated for the industry and for producers seeking to improve performance, health, and profitability. The highlight will be MacroGard, an intelligent modulating additive for the immune system, which functions according to the immune condition of each animal, reducing the risks and severity of diseases caused by viruses, bacteria, and parasites. A study shows that shrimps that have been given the MacroGard supplement presented a 66.6% higher survival rate after a challenge when compared with shrimps that have not been given the supplement.

Besides MacroGard, Biorigin will present other 100% natural ingredient solutions from its portfolio, designed for intestinal health and mycotoxin control as well as a nutritional supplement, a source of protein and energy.

According to the Feed Business Global Manager, Roberto Vituzzo, “Biorigin continually invests in the development of solutions for the shrimp and tropical fish industry, bringing to the market the expertise acquired through studies that show best results in survival rates, performance and resistance to disease, offering products that are 100% natural, effective and waste-free, such as MacroGard.”


About Biorigin
Founded in 2003, the company mobilizes knowledge and technology, based on biotechnological processes, to develop innovative solutions in 100% natural ingredients for animal and human health and welfare. 


Its animal nutrition portfolio includes 100% safe products, ensured by the total traceability of its production process (since the raw material supplied by Zilor), and quality guaranteed by certifications ISO 9001:2008, ISO 22000:2005, Kosher, Halal, GMP+B2 and HACCP certifications. For further information: www.biorigin.net
Biorigin
Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

30/09/2014: A unique aquacare software platform for improved fish health management

Novartis Animal Health Aqua (NAH Aqua) today announced the launch of aquacare, an innovative fish health management software to assist fish farmers continuously improve health management practices for the optimum balance of quality and profitability. aquacare represents a next generation service platform that will enable higher productivity in collection and management of health-related data, and improved decision-making. The software will begin rolling out to customers in a phased approach
  • Aquacare platform offers significant opportunities for improved health management tools, best practices and productivity for fish farmers
  • Developed in collaboration between NAH, a leader in fish health, and Ocea, a leader in fish farming software
  • Platform will provide real time, complete life-cycle healthcare information, increasing scope of NAH technical services resources

www.novartis.com

Developed in collaboration with Ocea Mercatus, the aquacare tool combines the fish health expertise of NAH Aqua with the state-of-the-art farm software capability of Ocea. Combined, the two companies invested a total of $1.2 million to develop this pioneering tool which provides real time information and is a step forward towards improving healthcare best practices and the way technical services are delivered by NAH. NAH is a pioneer in fish healthcare systems with more than 10,000 farm visits logged by the technical services teams globally since 2002.

“Novartis Animal Health Aqua is pleased to bring the aquacare platform to our customers as part of our ongoing commitment to the industry,” said Matthias Hofer, Global Head of the NAH Aqua business. “Pulling from a global pool of data, aquacare will offer functionality and technology unlike anything else in the market, and increase the support NAH Aqua can provide to farmers.”

Aquacare is designed for global application so that farmers will be able to benchmark  their results across the salmonid-farming regions. The platform will ultimately link healthcare data to daily operations to provide complete life-cycle healthcare tracking, reporting and analysis, which are not available through other software systems. It will also incorporate follow-up, alert and reminder functions that help to ensure seamless service right through to harvest.

“What differentiates the platform is a very user-friendly interface design,” said Per Christian Engdal, Chief Technical Officer for Ocea Mercatus. “Combined with the analytical power and flexibility of the software, we see unique potential in aquacare and benefits for customers.”

NAH and Ocea will continue to develop the aquacare platform in response to farmers’ feedback and industry needs. Implementation of the first release will be managed directly by the NAH Aqua Technical Services professionals, working together with the customer. Future releases are already planned, including the launch of a customer portal and further analytic functionalities.

Aquacare is exclusively available through Novartis Animal Health, for both Ocea and non-Ocea software users. For further information about aquacare, please contact your local Novartis Animal Health Aqua representative.

Friday, September 26, 2014

26/09/2014: Norel has a new distributor in the Colombian market

Norel Animal Nutrition

Biotecno-V is a company specialised in raw materials for animal nutrition and animal health. Biotecno-V produce, commercialize and distribute products with innovation and add-value for the feed industry sector.
  
Biotecno-V has a professional team dedicated to the satisfaction of the needs of the customers through specialized products and optimal quality in nutrition and animal health, national and international, boosting the technology and developing new products.

Norel, always thinking in the customers services decided to open new operations in Colombia. The new project will allow us to have presence in the feed additives sector with specialized products, developed with the higher technology and know-how.

Norel’s products are present in the Colombian market, from now. The customers’ services and the quality of our products drive us to the excellent results that we are expecting.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

23/09/2014: Fish-hungry Japan slashes tuna catch by 50%


After decades of overfishing, Japan is taking aim at increasing the number of blue fin tuna in the ocean.

 Last updated: 20 Sep 2014 11:17 [Al Jazeera]

 
A single weighty tuna with the right fat and meat could sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars in Japan [EPA]



After several decades of reckless overfishing, mostly by Japanese fleets eager to satisfy their country's increasing demand for sushi and sashimi, stocks of blue fin tuna in the Pacific Ocean have declined alarmingly. Japan accounts for more than 70 percent of the Pacific blue fin tuna caught, according to the government's Fisheries Agency.

As a consequence, the most recent stock assessment of Pacific blue fin tuna made by the International Scientific Committee for Tuna and Tuna-like Species in the North Pacific Ocean (ISC), noted that the population "level is near historically low levels and experiencing high exploitation rates".
The situation is so dire that Japan's Fisheries Agency felt compelled to announce in March it would cut the country's allowable haul of Pacific immature blue fin tuna by 50 percent in 2015.  The agency followed this up by lobbying other countries fishing in the region to do likewise, and this month succeeded in obtaining their agreement.

During a conference of countries belonging to the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) that took place in Fukuoka, Japan, from September 1-4, the other major catchers of tuna - South Korea, Taiwan, Canada and the United States - promised to make the same deep cuts as Japan.            
"People realised something had to be done about the level of catch," Glenn Hurry, executive director of the WCPFC, told Al Jazeera. "The biomass [of the blue fin tuna] that researchers are talking about is only three to four percent of the original spawning biomass, which is not a level you should commercially fish fisheries."
 

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Thursday, September 18, 2014

18/09/2014: Fish faarmers list on the share market in Australia


Australia’s $40 billion aquaculture industry is expected to boom by the end of this decade as the country’s biggest fish farmers Tassal and Cleanseas turn their fortunes around and inspire others to list on the Australian share market.

Huon Aquaculture is considering listing on the Australian Securities Exchange in a float that could be worth Aus$400 million.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

18/09/2014: VIUSID aqua from Catalysis

Catalysis' product VIUSID aqua

A specific product to improve productivity of aquaculture




Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

18/09/2014: Soft Robotic Fish: New Invention at MIT

IFL Science have invented a great new device with many applications and potential for fish farmers.

A soft robotic fish that was developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), by
Andrew Marchese, is reported to be capable of movement similar to that of a real fish. This "self-contained autonomous soft robot" can perform rapid movement, and by convulsing its body it can carry out escape maneuvers to change direction almost as quickly as a real fish can. 
 
Soft robotics is a relatively new field of robotics, which has earned its own journal- Soft Robotics. This field involves the development of robots from soft materials, making them flexible and ideal for movement around limited spaces, with the ability to change gait (locomotion achieved through movement) easily. Daniela Rus, director of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, who also helped to design and build the fish, is very excited about this research. "As robots penetrate the physical world and start interacting with people more and more, it's much easier to make robots safe if their bodies are so wonderfully soft that there's no danger if they whack you."

One of the draws to soft robotics is that, in contrast to other robotic systems whereby collisions with the environment result in inefficient motion, collision may actually aid in their locomotion. This is because soft robots can "use these points of contact as a means of getting to the destination faster," according to Rus in MIT's announcement of the research. 
This particular fish was built by first using a 3D printer to generate molds, which were then used to cast the head and tail from silicone rubber. A polymer ring was used to protect the fish's "guts" (electronics). It runs on carbon dioxide, and in its current form can perform around 20-30 escape maneuvers before running out. Marchese says, "the fish was designed to explore performance capabilities, not long-term operation," although he adds "Next steps for future research are taking that system and building something that's compromised on performance a little bit but increases longevity." The new fish will involve a water pump instead of carbon dioxide.

But researchers don't plan on just watching these fish swim around for the fun of it. Rus hopes that these fish can be applied to study fish in their natural habitat. They could be used to infiltrate schools of fish, allowing scientists to gather data on the behaviour of these animals in the wild.

Check out this YouTube video for more info on the fish:


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

18/09/2014: Muyang to showcase FAMSUN brand feed-to-meat solutions at VIV China 2014

A new pellet mill launch, the first presence of its animal farming systems and a booth of 445.5m2 await FAMSUN’s customers and visitors to VIV China next week, 23-25 September.

FAMSUN
The wide international reach of VIV and its coverage of all sectors in the animal protein production chain provide an ideal platform for FAMSUN to introduce its latest products to the industry.

The 35T/H pellet mill to be unveiled is the first gear drive press in FAMSUN pellet mill family. It is developed by the European R&D Institute of Muyang Company. Driven by a 250 kW motor, the robust machine can produce high quality pellets steadily above 35 tons per hour without downtime. Besides the exhibited press, a model of 25T/H capacity is also available for this gear drive series to meet different production demands.

For aquafeed producers and people who interesting in improving production efficiency, the FAMSUN MY 120×2 Twin-Screw Extruder and the FAMSUN-WEM Automation System backed by bountiful proven data from production practices will give out solutions.

It will also be the first time that the FAMSUN animal farming family presents itself at VIV trade shows. FAMSUN delicate cage raising systems, flat raising steel structure houses and pig penning systems as well as farm climate control systems will be seen on the 445.5m2 booth.      

For more information, please visit FAMSUN booth at W1.E032.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

17/09/2014: Bangladeshie fish farmers lose tax privileges

Report by Sohel Parvez
 

The National Board of Revenue yesterday withdrew tax privileges for fish farming to rein in tax-dodging by a section of dishonest taxpayers who allegedly shift income from other sources to fisheries to evade tax.
 
http://www.thedailystar.net/business/fish-farming-loses-tax-privileges-41837
Corruption puts tax relief in doubt

The existing tax rate of three percent on income from fish cultivation will no longer be effective, the NBR said in a notice. Income from the sector will be subject to normal tax rates, it said.

"It means the tax rate for companies involved in fish farming will be 35 percent. And individuals having income from fish cultivation will pay tax at normal rates depending on their income levels," an NBR official said, asking not to be named.

The NBR move comes after it found that a section of corrupt people, including some politicians, businesses and government officials, took advantage of the tax benefit in fish cultivation and claimed to have incomes from such business.

In July last year, the NBR offered the reduced tax rate for fish farming and some other areas to encourage diversification and increase the supply of protein.

The privilege was given for two years beginning from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2015. Prior to the reduced rate, five percent tax was applicable to income from fish cultivation. Taxmen said it is difficult to assess fish stocks in ponds and one can claim any amount of income from such farming.

The advantage was taken by some people to dodge taxes and legalise illegal earnings. "We have found that the opportunity was misused," the NBR official said.

Taxmen said some people having fish farms show excessive amounts of income from farming by diverting incomes from other taxable sources.

Another group of people do not have fish farms but they claim to have incomes from such business. "But our field officials do not find any ponds during inspection, and these people claim the farms are either closed or the ponds have dried up," he said.

"As a result, we were losing a huge amount to revenue." Farming of fish, including shrimp, expanded during the past three decades, particularly in the north-eastern, north and south-western regions.

Production of fish from cultivation more doubled to 18.59 lakh tonnes in fiscal 2012-13 from 8.56 lakh tonnes a decade ago, according to the Department of Fisheries.

Cultivated fish accounts for more than half of the supply of 34.10 lakh tonnes a year.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

17/09/2014: Students develop cheap water treatment system using chip packets

by Justine Alford 

A team of students at the University of Adelaide, Australia, has designed an elegantly simple yet efficient water treatment system using empty chip packets, some plywood and glass tubing. What’s more, the whole thing cost just Aus$67 and doesn’t require skilled engineers to assemble, making it ideal for remote communities with no access to clean water.
 
http://www.iflscience.com/technology/students-develop-cheap-water-treatment-system-using-chip-packets
Photo credit: Kara LaFleur, "Delhi-1," via Flickr. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

In the Western world, most of us probably take our taps and bottled water for granted. Safe water is something that millions of people across the globe do not have the privilege to access. According to the CDC, around 1 in 9 people, or 780 million individuals, don’t have access to improved drinking water sources. Drinking unsafe water exposes individuals to a variety of pathogens that often cause diarrheal diseases, among others. It’s estimated that 1.5 million people, 90% of whom are children, die each year from consuming dirty water.

Determined to make a difference, University of Adelaide scientists teamed up with ChildFund Australia to learn about the water problems faced by many communities in Papua New Guinea (PNG). They often rely on large tanks to collect rainwater which are easily contaminated with disease-causing microbes.

“Our priority was to develop a system with, and not just for, the end-users,” lead researcher Dr Cristian Birzer said in a news-release. 


“We wanted something where we could provide design guidelines and let the local communities build and install their own systems using readily available materials that could easily be maintained and replaced.”

The team started off by developing an efficient water treatment system using high-quality materials. Then, using this as a basis for design, they built a rudimentary version using much cheaper materials. Their finished product works by guiding sunlight towards water inside a glass tube with the help of a half cylinder lined with reflective foil chip packets. The Sun’s UV-A radiation then stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species in the water which can irreversibly damage pathogens’ DNA, ultimately causing them to die. 


The students tried out various different reflective materials and found that chip packets, which are a common trash item, worked just as well as anything else. In less than 30 minutes, the innovative system could reduce high concentrations of E. coli to undetectable levels.

According to Birzer, the team wanted to avoid the “white man solution” by coming up with a tailor-made solution to a real problem that PNG communities face.

“The final design is something that anyone can make, so it’s not a product we’re giving, it’s just a concept, a design that anyone can make and therefore they own it - it’s theirs,” Birzer told ABC News.

Costing just Aus$67, the system can clean up almost 40 liters of water in just four hours. If several systems are installed together, then larger quantities can be treated to meet the needs of larger villages.

According to ABC News, ChildFund are due to start trials of the device shortly in PNG. If successful, the concept will be rolled out across the country to rural villages in need.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

17/09/2014: New CEO appointed for the BioMar Group

Torben Svejgard, who has been Group CEO in BioMar since 2008, has resigned from his position in order to focus on a career as a full-time board member. The BioMar board has appointed Vice President Carlos Diaz as new Group CEO. He will take over the seat from Torben Svejgard sometime towards the end of the year.
 

http://www.biomar.com/en/Corporate/News/New-CEO-appointed-for-the-BioMar-Group/
New CEO appointed for the BioMar Group

Torben Svejgard says about his decision: "My 6 years with BioMar has been fantastic. Aquaculture is an exciting industry and BioMar is a wonderful company with wonderful and smart people. It has thus been a very difficult decision for me to resign, but this is the right time for me to withdraw from the executive life and seek a new career path as a non-executive."

Chairman of the board, Jens Bjerg Sorensen, says: "First I want to thank Torben for his contribution to BioMar's development over the past 6 years. His successor Carlos has been with BioMar since 2000 and after a strong career in the Chilean organisation he has during the last years broadened his responsibility area successfully, so he today has responsibility for the two Regions Americas and Continental Europe and on top of that he is the overall responsible for business development. I and the board are thus confident that we in Carlos have a strong Group CEO, who can lead the company towards new heights."

Carlos Diaz is 45 years old, has a background as a veterinarian and holds an MBA with specialization in marketing and commercial management. Before BioMar he has been working in the aquaculture industry in some Chilean companies, as well as in the pharmaceutical industry.

Commenting his appointment Carlos Diaz says: " I am pleased and happy to take this new professional challenge in my career and contribute to consolidate and grow BioMar as a global leader in fish feed. I am sure that with all the good people in the company we can continue making a difference and creating value for our customers, employees and shareholders".



Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Extru-Tech - International Aquafeed 1404



Extru-Tech, Inc.® offers a full line of "Vertical" and "Horizontal" Cooling Solutions. The exclusive Double Wall Vertical Cooler features a patented internal perforated core and external air plenum cone. Air is drawn through the product from a full 360° for truly superior product consistency throughout the entire batch.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

16/09/2014: Carp in demand - one of the prime cultivated fish worldwide today

The global market for aquaculture is expected to reach US$202.96 billion by 2020, according to a new study by Grand View Research, Inc.
 

 http://m.benzinga.com/article/4853060?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+benzinga+%28Benzinga+News+Feed%29&utm_referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.co.uk%2F

Aquaculture includes farming of aquatic organisms such as mollusks, fish, crustaceans and other aquatic flora and fauna. Increasing consumer awareness of health benefits associated with seafood and growing consumption serves as a key driver for development of the market.

In addition, the market demand is expected to be further fuelled by the lack of naturally available varieties owing to extensive fishing. Rice-fish culture is expected to serve as key growth opportunity for this market over the next six years.

Carps were the largest product segment, accounting for 25,137.6 tonnes of global aquaculture demand in 2013 and is expected to reach 29,462.8 tonnes in 2020, growing at a CAGR of 2.2% from 2014 to 2020.

The demand for carps is expected to rise as it is one of the prime cultivated fish due to its high compatibility with non-ideal environmental conditions and its extensive use in fish farming. Mollusks were the second largest product segment, with market demand exceeding 16,619.6 tonnes in 2013, owing to health benefits resulting in high consumption.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

16/09/2014: Aquaculture is recognised in the call for Lantra nominations in Scotland

Lantra Scotland - Land-based and Aquaculture Learner of the Year Awards 2015 Open for Nominations
 

http://www.scotlandfoodanddrink.org/news/article-info/5386/lantra-scotland-land-based-and-aquaculture-learner-of-the-year-awards-2015-open-for-nominations.aspx

Lantra Scotland, the sector skills council for the land-based, environmental and aquaculture sectors, is calling on all employers, instructors, tutors, trainers, teachers and mentors to put forward their nominations.

Now in their 12th year, the awards recognise and celebrate the achievements of young people and new entrants embarking on careers in the land-based, environmental and aquaculture sectors and are open to all vocational learners, students and Modern Apprentices working in the following sectors: agriculture, aquaculture, equine, fisheries management, environmental conservation, game and wildlife, horticulture, trees and timber and land-based engineering.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

16/09/2014: Worried Senegal fishermen rallied the entire village to take action to save their livelihoods

For generations, the fishermen of Ngaparou, a Senegalese coastal village 64 kilometers south of Dakar, have relied on the Atlantic ocean’s wealth of fish and crustaceans to fill their nets, their wallets, and their stomachs.

However, recent surges in illegal fishing, resulting in overfishing, have threatened to eliminate several species that could once be found in abundance, leaving Ngaparou’s villagers vulnerable to stark poverty.

http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2014/09/15/in-senegal-fishermen-come-together-to-fish-smarter-and-more-sustainably
For the people of Ngaparou, fishing is their principal livelihood. However, recent surges in illegal fishing, resulting in overfishing, have threatened to eliminate several species that could once be found in abundance, leaving Ngaparou’s villagers vulnerable to poverty.

As the situation became dire, worried fishermen rallied the entire village to take action in an effort to save their livelihoods and maintain their way of life. The village came together to establish the Local Fishermen’s Committee of Ngaparou (known by its French acronym, CLP), with the goal of implementing a community-based fisheries management aimed at restoring fish stocks and promoting a healthy marine environment. Supported by $15 million dollars in funding from the World Bank, this Senegalese component of the West Africa Regional Fisheries Program (WARFP) enables the people of the Ngaparou to confront the challenge of over-exploited fish resources with sustainable solutions while benefiting from a social safety net.

To tackle the problem of overfishing, the CLP had to convince fishermen in Ngaparou “that it was better to refrain from fishing in certain zones in order to benefit from markedly higher fishing yields when these areas, which were subject to protection, are reopened,” explains Mansour Ndour, the local project facilitator.

With the agreement and cooperation of the village’s fishermen, the CLP divided Ngaparou’s fishing perimeter into three areas spanning 3 kilometers wide and 12 kilometers long. “We have a closed area where all fishing is prohibited, and a reef area where fishing is allowed during certain periods of the year and where we apply stricter fishing procedures than even those in effect nationally, particularly with respect to fishing nets,” says CLP member Ibou Ndoye.

However ensuring compliance with the rules concerning the protected areas has proved to be difficult. Despite the fact that voluntary community surveillance missions perform an average of 20 trips per month to drive away illegal fishermen, there continues to be problems with poachers who often use violence to threaten surveillance volunteers. Furthermore, the future of this surveillance is uncertain given that these volunteers operate without a legally defined status and lack access to any kind of recourse when they are victims of attacks.

While attacks at sea and changing traditional habits can be challenging, the CLP continues to persevere as the rewards reaped are well worth the work with statistics reflecting the CLP’s significant impact over the past few years. The average weight of lobsters caught in the area has increased by 72%, from 295 grams in 2005 to 420 grams in 2010. Lobster yields have more than doubled from 1.5 kilograms per catch in 2006 to 3.5 kilograms per catch in 2010. Demersal fish species that live on the ocean floor have gradually reappeared and pelagic (deep-sea) species as well as juvenile fish flourish in the community managed zone.

The women of Ngaparou are also benefiting from the positive impact of the CLP’s community-based management strategy and the higher yields of fish captures. Waré Signaté, a fishmonger and member of the CLP, has seen an increase in her income as well as the incomes of women around her thanks to the use of a refrigerated truck, put at their disposal by the CLP. “We are now able to transport fish and crustaceans to the market of Mbour instead of selling them off cheaply to wholesale fish merchants who come from other areas,” says Signaté.

“Beyond the positive results of the project, I am really impressed by the sense of a newly rediscovered pride expressed by the villagers.  I believe this comes from the fact that they have demonstrated their ability to organize themselves as a group to implement a larger communal strategy, despite the challenges stemming from such a novel initiative,” notes Bérengère Prince, Senior Natural Resource Management Specialist in charge of the WARFP.

It comes as no surprise that visitors from other regions of Senegal and foreign delegations from Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Cape Verde travel to Ngaparou to draw inspiration and learn from the accomplishments of this coastal village in the hopes of recreating this success.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

Monday, September 15, 2014

Evodos - International Aquafeed 1404




The Evodos Spiral Plate Technology Dynamic Settlers are designed especially for removing solids from liquid as well as separating liquid mixtures.

"I have been looking at and making application of all kinds of liquid/solids separation technologies for nearly 20 years.  What you have developed is by far and away the most efficient and advanced process I’ve ever looked at.  You have hit a home run with your spiral plate technology to dewater algae and animal manures." -Benjamin Brant, CEO Ecoponex, OC/USA.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

15/09/2014: Global Alliance against Industrial Aquaculture recommends pizza as a healthier choice

Smoked Scottish Salmon is coming in for strong criticism due to its perceived high fat content. 

Rebecca Smith, the Medical Editor at The Telegraph online news service, equates the health benefits - or in this case the unhealthy benefits - of salmon with that of the common pizza! Are we gently being persuaded here that a pizza might be a better, healthier choice for dinner than a fillet of Scotland's finest? How bizarre is that?! 
http://yumthatstasty.com/category/dinner-recipes/healthy-dinner-recipes/fish-recipes/

In the fairness that is journalism The Aquaculturists give the floor to Ms Rebecca Smith to extol her point-of-view and promote the views of the GAIA while we settle down on our couch to a fine if not fit, 'lean' Scottish salmon delivered by that fine purveyor of food, Waitrose!


By , Medical Editor

"Smoked salmon made from fish farmed in Scotland contains more fat than a pizza, an investigation has found.

"The farmed version of smoked salmon products also contain at least three times as much fat as the wild equivalent.

Salmon is marketed as a healthy oily fish that contains omega 3 fatty acids which are good for health.

"Oily fish should be eaten at least once a week under healthy eating recommendations.

"However, campaigners have called farmed salmon the 'couch potato' of fish because it is grown in a confined space and does not swim the same distances as the leaner, less fatty wild fish.

"An analysis by the Sunday Times found a classic Pizza Express margherita contains 6.4g of fat per 100g while Sainsbury's Scottish oak smoked salmon made from farmed fish contains 14g of fat per 100g.

"The wild equivalent, Sainsbury's wild Alaskan smoked salmon contains 3.2g of fat per 100g. Tesco's farmed smoked salmon contains three times as much fat as the wild alternative with 9.9g of fat per 100g compared with 3.3g of fat, the newspaper found.

"In Waitrose, the Heston Blumenthal lapsang souchong tea smoked salmon contains 10.5g of fat per 100g while the wild Alaskan whisky oak smoked salmon contains just 2.7g per 100g.

"Don Staniford, director of the Global Alliance against Industrial Aquaculture, told the Sunday Times: "The farmed salmon is a couch potato compared to the majestic and iconic wild salmon. It is complete nonsense to describe this flabby farmed fish as lean and healthy."


"Waitrose said it would change the use of the word "lean" on the lapsang souchong tea smoked salmon. A spokesman said: "We are very sorry for this oversight, which we are correcting immediately."

"A Sainsbury's spokesman said that it always clearly marked smoked salmon as wild or farmed and pointed out that they are different species of salmon, so "looking at the fat content between the two is not comparing like for like".

"Tesco told the Sunday Times its farmed smoked salmon products were clearly labelled and included the location of the farm.

"The omega-3 fatty acids in fish are beneficial but United States Department of Agriculture data has shown that the fat in farmed salmon contains a smaller proportion of omega-3 fatty acids than in the wild fish.

"The farmed salmon is, however, likely to contain more omega-3 overall because of the higher levels of fat."


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

15/09/2014: Ocean policy and marine planning on the move

Ocean policy and marine planning are moving forward rapidly on a range of issues, with long-term implications for ocean industries, topics that will be discussed at the World Ocean Council's Business Forum later this month in New York.

http://www.oceancouncil.org/

Topics will include:

New “Law of the Sea” regulations are being negotiated by governments
The UN is now negotiating a new global ocean authority (“Implementing Agreement”) on marine protected areas, environmental impact assessment, area-based management tools, marine genetic resources, and more. 


What will the revised Law of the Sea mean for shipping, oil/gas, fisheries, seabed mining, marine biotechnology, submarine cables and other users?

Special ocean areas are being identified by governments

Over 190 governments are approving the identification of special ocean areas via the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), with little input from industry.
How will the management of these special ocean areas impact shipping, fishing, seabed mining, and other users?

Governments adopted international EIA guidelines for coastal/marine activities
Over 190 governments have also approved Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) guidelines for commercial activities in marine areas through the CBD.
How will the ocean EIA guidelines affect coastal/marine industry activity?

Rules to regulate marine sound are being developed in several fora
The CBD, International Maritime Organization (IMO), EU and others are all working on the cross-sectoral marine sound issue.
 

How can industry continue to ensure there is solid science behind the sound regulations that will affect oil/gas, shipping, construction, and other sectors?

A patchwork of regulations on marine invasive species is emerging
National and sub-national regulations on marine invasive species have been developed in different locations, such as Australia, New Zealand, California.
 

How can industry ensure a more coordinated approach to regulations that will affect shipping, dredging, oil/gas, fisheries and others who move vessels around the globe?

Global Ocean Commission (GOC) findings will be presented to the UN
This high level panel’s recommendations include:

  • Creating a “Global Ocean Accountability Board” to monitoring progress toward a healthy ocean
  • Creating a High Seas Regeneration Zone
  • Establishing binding offshore oil/gas international safety standards and liability
  • Ending harmful subsidies to high seas fisheries
  • Closing seas, ports and markets to illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing
How should the Ocean Business Community collaborate to provide coordinated, constructive engagement on these far reaching recommendations?

An ocean “Sustainable Development Goal” is being negotiated by governments
The UN is negotiating Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including one for the ocean, to guide international development and environment aims over the next 15 years.
How can the Ocean Business Community best engage and provide coordinated input to this long-term global goal for ocean use and protection?

Marine planning is advancing rapidly in many places
Marine spatial planning (MSP), ocean zoning and other forms of marine area-based management are being developed in more and more countries and regions, and are being proposed for international waters.
How to best ensure that ocean industries are well informed on marine planning as it moves forward and, if appropriate, develop coordinated, multi-sectoral engagement?

We invite you to participate in the WOC Business Forum to tackle these important questions with your ocean industry colleagues.
 

Representatives from oil and gas, shipping, seafood, fisheries, mining, aquaculture, renewable energy, ocean data, science and technology, maritime law, and other sectors will meet in New York.
 

Collaborate with other leadership companies to determine:
  • Which ocean policy and planning developments are most critical to industry?
  • Are ocean industries sufficiently informed of these processes?
  • How can and should the Ocean Business Community engage?
  • What are the dangers and lost opportunities of not engaging?
  • How can the Ocean Business Community ensure that governments, the UN and other intergovernmental processes recognize and engage industry as a key stakeholder in ocean policy and marine planning?
iii The panel “Collaboration in Science-Based Ocean Policy and Marine Planning” will take place on Monday, 29 September 2014, 8:30am – 9:30am at the WOC Business Forum on Ocean Policy and Planning (New York, 28-30 Sept, 2014).

Confirmed high level speakers:
  • Máire Geoghegan-Quinn, EU Commissioner, Research, Innovation and Science
  • Matthew King, Deputy Minister of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO), Canada
  • Holly Bamford, Assistant Administrator, National Ocean Service, US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
These eminent speakers will address:

  • What is the role of government in developing science-based ocean policy and marine planning in support of responsible industry operations?

  • How can government, science and business best collaborate to advance the Blue Economy and innovation for solutions, especially at an ocean basin scale?

  • How is trans-Atlantic cooperation in science-based ocean policy and marine planning being accelerated and coordinated in response to the EU, Canada and US Galway Statement commitment?


The WOC Business Forum on Ocean Policy and Planning is an unprecedented opportunity for ocean industries to engage high level officials from Europe, Canada and the US on ocean science, observations, innovation and business community collaboration.


SPECIAL ROOM RATES END FRIDAY, 12 SEPT: 
Reserve your room for the WOC Business Forum
The venue for the WOC Business Forum is the Roosevelt Hotel (45 East 45th Street at Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10017).
 
Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

15/09/2014: Nutreco appoints new Managing Director Asia

Nutreco has appointed Samson Li (Chinese national, 42) as the new Managing Director for its business unit Asia and member of Nutreco's Executive Committee with effect from 15 September 2014. Based in Hong Kong, Li will lead Nutreco's expansion in the Asian animal and fish feed markets. He will report to Knut Nesse, CEO of Nutreco.



 
Samson Li

http://www.nutreco.com

Li holds an MBA and a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry and a minor in economics from the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Previously he has worked for Novus International, an animal health and nutrition company, where he has held various management positions since 2001, most recently as a member of the Executive Leadership Team and Vice President Sales & Marketing based in St. Louis, USA. Li will succeed Hugues Le Ruz, who has been appointed as Managing Director for Nutreco's business unit Americas.

Nutreco has premix and fish feed plants in China, Vietnam, Indonesia and Japan and its total revenues in Asia amounted to approximately € 300 million in 2013. With a strategy focused on improving profitability by providing innovative and sustainable nutritional solutions to its customers, Nutreco has sound growth prospects in the Asian market.

"Nutreco is a leading player in the global animal and fish feed business and very much an R&D driven company," said Samson Li. "I look forward to taking Nutreco's ambitions in Asia to the next level."

Knut Nesse, CEO Nutreco: "I'm very happy that Samson Li will join Nutreco. He brings with him a wealth of experience, not only in our industry, but also generally in doing business in Asia. I'm confident his leadership will help us to accelerate our business growth in Asia."


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

Friday, September 12, 2014

12/09/2014: Coral trout and moray eels communicate

Despite their stunning colours and impressive pouts, the humble trout has never been considered the smartest of creatures. But the species may have been underestimated. 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2748352/Somethings-fishy-trout-eels-cooperate-underwater-hunt.html#ixzz3D8zelqHa


A new study has found that the coral trout could be just as clever as chimpanzees when it comes to teamwork.

UK researchers believe that the trout are able to select the most cooperative moray eels to help hunt for prey and use movements, such as headshakes, to communicate.

Coral trout are torpedo-shaped and about 21in (50cm) long. They have speed to chase down a fish out in the open, while the moray eel boasts a sinuous body to find prey in hard-to-reach places.

The eel benefits by being able to eat the fish chased into reef crevices by the trout. The trout benefits by being able to eat those fish the eel fails to catch.

Coral trout - along with close relative the roving coral grouper - will use gestures and signals to flag the location of prey to an eel, including head shakes and headstands that actually point the eel in the right direction.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news