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Wednesday, August 31, 2016

31/08/2016: Importance of specialty feed additives in modern aquaculture

By Dr Alexandros Szmartis

There are 303 different species cultured in the aquaculture in contrast to the whole livestock industry where the number of cultured animal species is only eighteen. Out of the total three hundred and three, there are two hundred and ten finfish species and thirty crustacean species farmed.

  
Dr Alexandros Szmartis
Each individual species has different culture conditions and biological needs as well as nutritional requirements and feeding behaviours.

As a result, the amount of research and customised applications for each one in aquaculture is multiple compared to livestock. In addition to the vast variation among aquatic species (from crustacean to marine carnivorous fish and fresh water filter feeder fish), the aquatic environment where the species live contribute to an even bigger challenges to the farmers and feed manufacturers. 

A typical example is the shrimp industry, where the animals have slow feeding behaviour. Being external masticators they nibble their feed patiently which results in a prolonged residence time of the feed pellets in the water. Consequently the nutrients that are present in the feeds are being leached out of the pellets or dissolved in the water.

This is considered as one for the main issues of the industry because the consumed and utilised nutrient intake does not meet the intended levels provided from the feed to meet the species requirements.

Read more HERE

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Zhengchang company profile



Established in 1918, Zhengchang has made constant innovations in feed machinery industry and accumulated a wealth of experience in tackling the various challenges facing feed companies and, more importantly, is able to offer a range of comprehensive solutions. ZCME has now evolved into China’s largest manufacture of feed machinery and has 16 branches in China with over 1300 staff and more than thirty offices all over the world.

Zhengchang to date has successfully constructed more than 2000 turnkey projects around the world, covering the fields of poultry and livestock feed, aquatic feed, pet food, premix feed, sawdust pellets, fertilizer, silo storage, pasture, electrical control and garbage treatment etc. ZCME projects are designed to deliver to the client higher feed quality, higher overall capacity and greater profits.

Zhengchang have overcome many challenges for their customers and accumulated rich experience over the past 90 years. According to their website, "we are now making great endeavors to apply our latest achievements to feed, pasture, environment protection, fertiliser, and sawdust shaping industries".

Zhengchang is more than a professional partner who can provide advanced machinery, technology and management ideas. It is also a true problem solver who knows you well enough to oversee your development.

Zhengchang is with you every step of the way.
Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

31/08/2016: Cardinal Tetra sourced from deep in the Amazon

Barcelos is a tiny city located deep within Brazil’s Amazon rainforest. For the past 50 years Barcelos has been a key contributor in the unique trade of colourful tropical fish, harvesting millions per for home aquariums around the world.

Cardinal Tetra: carolineCCB
In an article written by Mike Tuccinardi which was recentlypublished on Atlas Obscura, the story was told of a small city which supplies tropical fish to the world.

The city which can only be reached by boat or flights from Manaus suffered when competition in the rubber industry grew due to increased plantations in Asia. However in 1956 the brightly coloured fish, Cardinal Tetra or Paracheirodon axelrodi was discovered and as a result Bercelos has been a hub for the valuable commodity since.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

31/08/2016: Lesser salmon catfish feasting on mice

In an article written by Robin Wylie which was recently published onNewScientist, it was reported that lesser salmon catfish have been discovered feeding on mice. Apparently some catfish are known to ambush pigeons at the waters edge, earning the nickname of “freshwater killer whales”.

But the lesser salmon catfish might just be an opportunist, gobbling up animals when they drown. A survey of 18 lesser salmon catfish (Neoarius graeffei) from Ashburton river in northern Australia, suggests the fish can consume large quantities of small land animals when given the chance, almost half of the catfish had mice in their bellies.
 
Image: Tim Watts
“That is a lot, and a rare finding,” says Peter Lisi, an aquatic ecologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Read more: Super-fast evolving fish splitting into two species in same lake The stomachs of some catfish contained as much as 95 per cent small mammals, with two fish having three animals each in their stomachs.

Lesser salmon catfish can grow to half a metre long and weigh up to 1.5 kilograms. They are a common species in dryland rivers of north-western Australia, so their diet is important to understanding the local ecosystems. They were thought to feed mainly on aquatic invertebrates and plants, with the occasional addition of fruit and terrestrial insects, especially during the floods in the wet season.
Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

30/08/2016: Increases sales of B.C. agrifood products in 2015, seafood sector up to $867 million

Image: Daniela A Nievergelt
According to a recent article posted on the British Columbia government news site, sales of B.C. agrifood products topped $13 billion for the first time in 2015, growing by more than $700 million for the second consecutive year, and contributing to a $2.5 billion (24 percent) rise in revenues since 2010.

The B.C. government has been partnering with growers and trading partners to increase markets for B.C. farmers and food producers, and the benefits of working together are showing results.

The growth in sales has occurred across B.C.’s diverse agrifood and seafood sectors with: The primary agriculture sector (farmers, ranchers and producers) up 4.5 percent to $3.1 billion; the seafood sector up 4.7 percent to $867 million; and the food and beverage manufacturing sector up 9.1 percent to $9.1 billion. B.C. market shares are expanding in part through programs supported by the B.C. government.

The $8-million Buy Local program increases the sales of B.C. products within the province, while a network of 13 international trade offices, B.C. trade missions, and innovation and market development funding have all played roles in growing B.C.’s sales across the country and around the world.

Increasing production, driving competitiveness, and building markets are three key priorities of the B.C. Agrifood and Seafood Strategic Growth Plan that has an overall goal of growing the B.C. agrifoods sector to a $15-billion-a-year industry by 2020.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

30/08/2016: Interview with Stefan Dullstein, Linde Gases

Stefan Dullstein is Head of Industrial Segment – Aquaculture and Water Treatment at The Linde Group. Here, he is responsible for management of R&D studies, market analyses, introduction of new products and training and supervision of students.

Stefan has been with Linde for more than 15 years working in various water treatment roles and, prior to that, worked in wastewater treatment and research for the Institute of Environmental Technology at the University of Bremen.

Mr Dullstein has an engineering degree from the Universityof Stuttgart and a PhD in dynamic simulation in wastewater treatment from the same university.

International Aquafeed magazine caught up with Mr Dullstein at Aquaculture UK recently, held this year at the Macdonald Aviemore Highland Resort, situated at the foot of the Cairngorm Mountains in Scotland.
 
Stefan Dullstein

Linde have many years of experience in the gas supply industry and have been long established as an international brand name. But who are Linde gases, and what is unique to the company that they are able to offer to the Aquaculture industry?

Linde gas is an international gas company with globally more than over 60,000 employees active in more than 100 countries globally, providing solutions for the gas industry and any other kind of application where you need gases and aquaculture is one of them, obviously. So in the field of aquaculture we are developing solutions for the fish farming industry since the mid 1980’s.

Linde undertakes the research and development of all our aquaculture technology at our Innovation Centre in Ålesund, Norway. With its highly equipped laboratories demonstration tanks, the Centre allows aquaculture technologists to observe how the latest oxygenation technologies impact farmed fish development.

Since its opening in 2012 Linde has introduced the capability to run warm water trials to understand and assess the performance of its technology in high temperature water environments inhabited by more tropical species.  Additionally, they have recently installed an external floating dock where technology trials can be performed in the surrounding fjord.

Are Linde currently developing any new aquaculture specific technologies, and if so, what are they and why is their function so important to the aquaculture industry? 
The most important factor for achieving healthy fish is to have healthy water; thus, controlling the concentration of oxygen dissolved in water is crucial in aquaculture. Maintaining the right level of oxygen in water improves utilisation of feed, reduces fish mortality and reduces the need for vaccination and antibiotics.

The latest development that we are presenting here is the Solvox Drop-In unit, which can be used for sea cages when you have low oxygen concentration. Naturally in sea cages, you would always have enough oxygen from the surrounding water so its for where naturally.

Read the full interview HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Aller Aqua company profile




Aller Aqua produce fish feed for freshwater and saltwater aquaculture. That is the brief presentation, but it doesn’t even come close to covering the entire story.

Aller Aqua is a family owned company with roots tracing back more than a thousand years. They have produced fish feed for more than 50 years, and this makes them one of the worlds most experienced fish feed producers, delivering some of the best products on the market, to their customers.

Today Aller Aqua has factories in Denmark, Poland, Germany and Egypt, they export products to more than 70 countries worldwide. They have a broad and professional product range, consisting of feed for 30 species of fish.

According to their website, “We know the importance the right feed plays in our customers production, and therefore our own professional development- and research centre in Germany, Aller Aqua Research, consistently works on optimising, developing and documenting the effect of our products. This ensures that our customers receive top-quality professional products, at competitive prices – delivered on time. As a company we are big enough to meet your needs, and small enough to be flexible”.

“This ensures that we can react quickly to our customer’s needs, which is essential when you strive not only to deliver fish feed, but also to spar with and contribute to optimising our customers businesses. Our experience and history is our guarantee to our customers that we know what we are talking about, that we keep our promises, and that we are right here – and that will still be the case in many years to come”.

Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Friday, August 26, 2016

26/08/2016: Biennial aquaculture event is proving to be quite a catch

by Andrew Wilkinson, International Aquafeed Magazine

Set at the foot of the Clengorn Mountains in the northern most reaches of Scotland, you will find the small picture postcard town of Aviemore. For the winter months at least, you could be forgiven for thinking that you were in an Alpine ski resort, as skiers from all over the world head north to tackle the challenging Glencorian slopes.


http://www.aquacultureuk.com
However, every other year when the snow thaws, the two day spectacular that is Aquaculture UK takes place. Now swelling to accommodate upwards of 130 exhibitors, Aquaculture UK took place from 23rd May to 24th May 2016 at the Aviemore Highland Resort in Inverness, United Kingdom. 

This event gave those present to view some of the very latest developments and innovations in the aquaculture industry. A truly international event, with industry leading exhibitors from over 30 countries occupying a myriad of booths within the very capacious conjoined marquees, the tens of thousands of fish farmers, journalists, industry experts and potential buyers and sellers who attended were certainly warmly welcomed to the exhibition.

Now in its tenth year, Aquaculture UK ventured into new territory as year as 5M Publishing took the helm for the very first time. Although former showman extraordinaire David Mack was still on hand to ensure that the smooth transition of the shows ownership took place with as few glitches as possible.

Everyone concerned delivered their tasks with absolute aplomb, with the show’s layout ensuring that all areas were accessible and there were no dead-ends or easily forgotten corners; although the marquee was very cold on the first morning. All areas were well lit but perhaps most importantly, there was an entire army of blue-jacketed 5M staff on hand to ensure that any issues were soon ironed out. 


Greeting attendees at every stand were the great and good of those with a vested interest in the technological side of aquaculture. Each stand, as you will see form the array of pictures that accompanies this article, was manned by exceptionally well presented, knowledgeable and friendly ambassadors for their respective brands. If you had a question, they were more than happy to answer it – or even swap a business card or two, and in some cases, a joke!

The conferences were also well attended and informative, with some of some really tricky subjects challenged absolutely head on and without hesitation. In some cases in fact, some conferences were so well attended that there was standing room only.

The Gala Dinner occupied the evening in between the show’s two main days. The entertainment was light with a traditional band warming up proceedings before a flavousome three-course meal was served. After the awards were presented, the after dinner speaker raised a titter or two from the large multi-national audience, shortly before everyone retired to bed in preparation for a busy second day.

The final day of the conference offered attendees the opportunity to cement relationships formed on day one of the show, as well as reflect on what was for many a very worthwhile experience. And as the sun shone on those packing up following a very rewarding two days, and the 130 or so exhibitors dispersed across the globe, only one regret remained – that this show is biannual, see you in two years and thank you Aquaculture UK 2016.

Read more HERE

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

26/08/2016: Nutriad sponsors TARS 2016 “Bring the shrimp industry to a new normal”

Nutriad once again sponsored The Roundtable Aquaculture Series (TARS), which was held during August 17-18 in Phuket, Thailand

Image: Natalle Mayno

TARS 2016 attracted key players in the shrimp industry involved in the production of breeders, aquafeed and post-larvae; farm owners and major suppliers in the region focusing preventing and controlling future disease outbreaks in shrimp aquaculture in Asia.
  
TARS is a recognised platform for aquaculture professionals in Asia-Pacific to exchange insights and experiences. 


The objective of this year’s event was to bring the industry to a “New Normal” following the devastating impact of the hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND - initially called Early Mortality Syndrome: EMS) on shrimp production in China, Thailand and Malaysia.

Shrimp farming in Thailand alone has cumulated losses in excess of US$5 Billion since the AHPND outbreak in 2013 and saw 100,000 jobs get lost as a result, according to speaker Andy Shinn of Fish Vet Group. Commented Allen Wu, APAC Manager Aquaculture with Nutriad: 

Dr. Maria Mercè Isern Subich
“The industry aims to achieve its objective of getting to a new normal through better health management and improved control of the variables in shrimp farming; build on up-scaled industrialisation and develop technical, operational and production efficiency from breeding to grow out.
 
Our additives range provides support to the industry in overcoming some of their key challenges related to nutrition and health.” Dr. Maria Mercè Isern Subich, Nutriad’s Business Development Manager Aquaculture Health presented a well-received talk on “Health Management for Profitable and Safe AquacultureProduction”, in which she contrasted the European approach and legislation in fish production with the current practices and challenges in the Asia-Pacific shrimp farming sector.

 

Visit the Nutriad website HERE.
Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Ferraz Machinery and Engineering Ltda company profile



Based in the city of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo state, Brazil, on the Via Ananhguera, one of the main highways of the country, Ferraz now occupies premises of approximately 13,000 m2, built on a land area of 32,000 m2.

All the products that the company sells are manufactured entirely on the premises of Ferraz by the most qualified professionals in the areas of machining, boilers, bodyshop, welding, lasers, shipping, services and spares.


Ferraz projects are in accordance with the standards of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) required by the Ministry of Agriculture, and bear the ANFAL quality seal PIQ-PET (National Association of Balanced Food Manufacturers).
According to their website, "We design and install complete lines for animal feed production processes - for branny, pelleting and extruded feeds. From start to finish of every factory installation project, we present and follow all the steps of its construction. We also provide aftercare, always bringing innovations and improvements to equipment as well as effective and constant technical assistance".
Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

26/08/2016: BioMar-Sagun feed factory opens in Turkey

The Joint Venture between the Danish feed company BioMar and Turkish seafood company Sagun officially opened a state-of-the-art fish feed factory in Söke, Turkey on Thursday 25th August.

The ribbon cutting ceremony was attended by more than three hundred guests. The factory has 50,000 tons production capacity and will supply locally produced high performance diets including grower feeds for trout, sea bass and sea bream. 


Other more specialised feed types in the BioMar-Sagun product portfolio, like hatchery diets and fry feeds, will be produced at other BioMar factories and distributed through BioMar-Sagun. BioMar-Sagun will mainly serve Turkey, but it will also start export sales to some of the neighboring countries.

Mr.Bora Aydemir, General Manager of BioMar-Sagun underlined that in addition to a complete range of high performance diets the company will provide Turkish fish farmers with BioMar’s well-known technical support to help farmers achieve a more cost efficient production.
  


Turkish fish farmers will receive guidance for appropriate farm management, nutrition, and feeding strategies that will eventually create a more efficient, sustainable and profitable aquaculture activity. The management of both Joint Venture partners were very pleased to see that the project has become a reality. The CEO of the BioMar Group, Mr.Carlos Diaz stated: “Turkey is a great country with excellent natural conditions for aquaculture and a high potential for growth.

As BioMar Group, we are delighted to be a part of the Turkish aquaculture industry. We have a great team here in Turkey. We believe in ourselves, we believe in our partners, and together we hope to make a solid contribution to the continued development of the aquaculture industry and to help realise the full potential for aquaculture in Turkey”.

 Likewise, the Vice Chairman of Group Sagun, Mr.Oğulcan Sagun expressed his opinion: “We are proud of being partners with the global fish feed giant BioMar. With BioMar’s knowledge and expertise in fish feed, we are determined to contribute to developing and bringing an innovative perspective to the Turkish aquaculture industry”.

According to Mr.Bora Aydemir, General Manager of BioMar-Sagun, the company will utilise the strengths of both partners in the joint-venture and strive for the development of a sustainable and profitable future for the aquaculture industry of Turkey: “We are here to supply our customers with efficient feed produced at a state of the art factory, and to make a notable difference in the Turkish aquaculture industry. We are here to innovate aquaculture”.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Thursday, August 25, 2016

25/08/2016: Chilean government officially decrees the creation of the Nazca-Desventuradas Marine Park

On Wednesday 24th August the Chilean government officially ordered the creation of the Nazca-Desventuradas Marine Park, which protects San Félix and San Ambrosio islands better known as Desventuradas.

Image: Malcolm Browne
According to a recent article written by Paula Díaz Levi on Oceana.org, it was reported thatWith this action, Chile has the largest marine park in the Americas and has tripled its protected oceanic areas. 

“In times when oceans are hit by the overexploitation of species, pollution and phenomena such as climate change, the protection of these islands means a great step forward for oceans in Chile and the rest of the world”, praised Liesbeth van der Meer, executive director of Oceana Chile.

Under the International Conference Our Ocean, held in Valparaíso in October 2015, President Michelle Bachelet announced the establishment of the Nazca-Desventuradas Marine Park. This new fully protected zone has a surface of 300,035 square kilometers (186,433 square miles) and is designed as a no-take area where fishing and other extractive activities will be banned. With the establishment of the Nazca-Desventuradas Park, Chile will not only have the largest marine park in the Americas, but it will also protect 12 percent of its marine surface area, accounting for a 4.4 percent increase.

   
Behind the proposal to create this marine park is an expedition conducted by National Geographic and Oceana in February 2013, led by a team of renowned national and international scientists who explored for the first time and with leading-edge technology one of the most pristine and wild places in South America. Scientists found a unique ecosystem with no signs of human impact and with an outstanding 90 percent level of endemic species –i.e. that are only found there.

Additionally, there is an abundance of algae forests and fish populations, like large tuna fish, yellow tail amberjacks, and deep water sharks, besides fragile deep-sea corals. An indicator of the exceptional health of these ecosystems are large-sized lobsters, with some individuals extending over more than one meter (3 feet) and weighing up to 8 kilograms (17 pounds).

After the expedition, a scientific report about the biodiversity in the Desventuradas was prepared, jointly with a proposal for the establishment of a large marine park surrounding the islands. This initiative was supported by the community in the Juan Fernández Archipelago.

After today’s publication of the decree, the next step is to prepare a management plan for this protected area, an action that will be accomplished by the National Fisheries and Aquaculture Service (Sernapesca), the Undersecretariat of Fisheries and Aquaculture (Subpesca) and the Ministries of the Environment and National Defense. The institutions in charge of monitoring will be Sernapesca and the Chilean Navy.

“The Nazca-Desventuradas Marine Park is a great step forward to achieve Chile’s commitment under the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. It is extremely important to protect ecologically relevant zones in Chile and for other countries to follow suit by establishing more protected areas that can promote the conservation and recovery of oceans and their resources,” finalised Ms van der Meer.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Biomin company profile




BIOMIN are dedicated to finding innovative, trend-setting solutions that empower their customers to master existing and future challenges in animal nutrition– the natural way. The application of their scientific know-how and expertise, based on an in-depth understanding of their customer’s needs and concerns, enables them to deliver solutions that support animal health, optimise performance and production efficiency.

Research and development is one of the cornerstones of BIOMIN. Their strong in-house research and development, and global cooperation with leading institutions and organisations form the basis by which innovative solutions are developed for their customers.

Through joint projects with renowned universities and research institutes, BIOMIN is constantly in touch with the latest scientific know-how, from which novel feed additives are developed and produced. Their global network of collaborating institutions has grown to over 100.

One of the cornerstones of BIOMIN’s success is the ongoing improvement of their inhouse quality standards. In 1997, BIOMIN introduced the international ISO 9001 standard. The HACCP system, introduced subsequently at BIOMIN’s production sites, provides the quality assurance our customers seek from them. In addition, the feed quality standards QS and GMP+ guarantee the utmost degree of control and quality for their products – from raw material inputs right through to the final product.

Concerns over climate change and the role of greenhouse gases continue to rise. In September 2011, BIOMIN was internationally recognised through the award of ISO 14040 ‘Life Cycle Assessment’ certification. By optimising feed use and improving animal performance, it is possible to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from livestock operations.
Through innovative production technologies and advanced, scientific know-how, BIOMIN has pioneered several trend-setting solutions for a range of animal nutrition products, all of which utilise fully natural processes and ingredients.

An in-depth understanding of what the customer’s needs and concerns are has enabled BIOMIN to create and deliver solutions in-line with performance and efficiency goals.
Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

25/08/2016: Remote controlled cleaning rig - FNC8

The Flying Net Cleaner 8 (FNC8) is an easy operated powerful, remote controlled net cleaner. It can be mobile controlled as well as controlled from the control room. The movements are unique, as it “swims” along the net in the cage, and cleaning with high-pressure seawater.

The lack of physical contact between the net cleaner and the net ensures no damages or tears to the net, thus reducing risk of fish escaping. The FNC8 is a patent applied principle, ensuring that the rig is in balance whether it cleans horizontally, vertically or upside down. This quality simplifies choice of suitable cleaning direction for any net type.
  

www.akvagroup.com

Cleaning speed is important for the operator, and FNC8 is able to clean at an incredibly fast and efficient rate – saving both time and reducing costs. Flying Net Cleaner 8 standardly includes ROV components that are easy to clean and disinfect.

It is a user-friendly device with built-in auto functions, sensors surveying the cleaning process, and advanced camera systems. The new Flying Net Cleaner 8 is prepared for collecting rinsed off organisms.

Twice as fast as the current systems
The FNC8 has a cleaning capacity, which is twice as fast as the current systems with minimal spread of dispose (ready for collecting) and surveillance sensors for improved pressure during the cleaning process.

The FNC8 also features thrusters, which are used not only for propulsion but for placing the cleaner close to the net without sharp wheels or belts. The FNC8 also boasts Rugged component and solid and open construction; making it easy to maintain and disinfect.

The FNC8 is controlled by pilot console and joystick, and the control unit (Top Side) are compatible with ROV solutions for net repairing, camera inspection, manipulator and rock drills HD cameras and monitor; with the FNC8 Standardly delivered with two HD cameras and two LED lights as standard, although the FNC8 is capable of accommodating four of each if purchasers wish to upgrade.

Data is graphically presented with overlay with a transponder connection to the “Advanced Control” navigation system; which is easy to operate with auto functions (prepared for autonomy operations).


Read the full article HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

25/08/2016: Register for Sustainable Ocean Summit 2016 Rotterdam

Register now for the 2016 WOC Sustainable Ocean Summit(SOS), Rotterdam, 30 Nov - 2 Dec, the only international ocean business event to provide a synthesis of global status and trends in ocean economic activity and progress in Corporate Ocean Responsibility.

With the theme of “Ocean 2030: Sustainable Development Goals and the Ocean Business Community,” SOS 2016 will gather ocean industry leaders to review ocean economic projections for the coming 15 years and develop industry-driven solutions to ocean sustainable development challenges.

www.ilago.ovh/sustainableoceansummit
Ensure you have a place at this unique gathering of the global ocean business community by registering early for SOS 2016.


To register, click HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Jefo company profile

  


Jefo is a world leader in the field of non-medicated performance feed additives for the poultry, swine, ruminant and aquaculture sectors. Founded in Canada in 1982, today Jefo has offices on 5 continents, and specialises in the design, manufacturing, warehousing and JIT-distribution of an array of animal nutrition specialty products.

Jefo is a pioneer in the green revolution taking place in animal nutrition.

"Our commitment is to providing effective alternatives for optimal performances in animal nutrition".

The Europe / Africa division of Jefo was created in 1998 and is headquartered in Nantes, France. We market a line of original products including vitamins, enzymes, organic acids and essential oils.

Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

24/08/2016: UV technology in aquaculture

by Michael Annett, Sales/Business Manager UV Systems, Pentair Aquatic Eco-Systems

When designed, installed and maintained properly, UV systems are extremely robust, reliable and effective. Pentair Aquatic Eco-Systems (PAES) is a leading manufacturer of UV water treatment systems for use in a range of industries.

PAES has particular expertise in designing and supporting UV systems in aquaculture field applications. In addition to new installations, PAES also provides consulting and support for UV systems that are installed in existing aquaculture facilities.
  

Enclosed UV Reactors

UV treatment has been used successfully for approximately six decades to treat and sanitise water in many critical applications. In this article, we will describe the array of UV system configurations along with their associated lamp technologies, to serve as a high-level guide to important design and operating considerations for UV systems.

UV process discussion Ultraviolet or UV energy is located in the electromagnetic spectrum with a wavelength shorter than that of visible light and longer than x-rays. When UV systems are deployed to treat water, the reactions are instantaneous, taking only a few seconds to occur, without the creation of disinfection by-products. Chemicals are not required and the associated hazards of chemical handling and storage are not present.

UV treatment does not alter colour, odour, taste or pH. As such, UV processes are environmentally safe and are considered ecologically-responsible technology. The science behind UV technology is well-established; and its efficacy is well-proven. UV systems are trusted in a wide range of industries including drinking water production, aquaculture farming and other applications.

UV light is comprised of electromagnetic radiation of wavelengths ranging from 100nm to 400nm:

•             UV-A (long wave UV): 315-400nm
•             UV-B (middle wave UV): 280-315nm
•             UV-C (short wave UV): 200-280nm
•             Vacuum UV: 100-200nm

Disinfection
When a UV system is used to treat water, UV light at the 254nm wavelength penetrates the cell wall of microorganisms that are present in the treatment water. The amount of UV delivered to the organism is called the dose. The UV energy permanently alters the DNA structure of the microorganism in a process called thymine dimerisation.

The microorganism is not destroyed, rather it is ‘inactivated’ and rendered unable to reproduce or infect.


Read the full article HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
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24/08/2016: Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council puts limits on forage fish species

Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, which oversees fishing in U.S. waters from New York State to North Carolina has decided to begin managing more than 50 species of forage fish. 

In a recent article written by Annie Sneed on the ScientificAmerican, it was reported that many of these “forage” species we have never heard of, let alone tasted them, but they play a vitally important role in the ocean, they are eaten by the fish we eat.

The council’s decision is a bit unusual—after all, none of the forage fish populations are in danger of collapse, and only one of the 50-plus species is harvested on a large scale in the mid-Atlantic today. In the region, people have mostly ignored these fish because they tend to be small, low-value and not very appetizing. But the council is trying to handle its fisheries more holistically because it has realized that putting controls on a single species at a time just will not work.
  
Image: Ingrid Taylar

“There's a move now to manage all fisheries as part of a bigger system,” says Steve Ross, a research professor at the University of North Carolina Wilmington who is one of the council’s scientific advisors. “When you manage one fish, you try to manage its whole environment—and that includes the food web.” 


These small, nutrient-rich forage fish pump energy through the ecosystem in a way that no other marine animal can. They feed on the bottom of the food chain—on single-celled plankton, which larger fish cannot eat—and then they become prey for all sorts of upper-level predators like tuna, sea bass and halibut as well as seabirds and marine mammals.

“I like to say that forage fish help turn sunlight into salmon,” explains Ellen Pikitch, a professor of marine biology at Stony Brook University. “They support so much of the ocean ecosystem.”

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

24/08/2016: Research alliance to improve aquaculture and livestock breeding

The University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute and Hendrix Genetics, a global leader in animal breeding, have established a research agreement to improve the sustainability of animal production.

Researchers will focus on driving innovations that lead to greater disease resistance in farmed animals and better selective breeding programmes.

www.ed.ac.uk
Their goal is to reduce losses and improve welfare in the fish farming and livestock industries. The agreement builds on existing collaborations in salmon disease genetics between the two organisations. 


The Roslin Institute already works closely with the salmon breeding company Landcatch, a Hendrix Genetics company based in Ormsary in Argyll, Scotland.

This collaboration has yielded the discovery of a gene that makes salmon more resilient to a viral disease. It has also led to the development of genetic tools that have improved selective breeding for resistance to sea lice. Scientists at the Universities of Stirling and Glasgow, as well as the University of Edinburgh's sequencing facility Edinburgh Genomics, were also part of the research team that led to these discoveries.

Dr Johan van Arendonk
The strategic partnership between Hendrix Genetics and The Roslin Institute will strengthen and extend their relationship. It will allow them to explore precision breeding technology, not only in aquaculture, but also in pig, chicken and turkey breeding. Dr Johan van Arendonk, Chief Innovation and Technology Officer at Hendrix Genetics said "This partnership with Roslin - a world leading research institute - offers a unique opportunity to improve our breeding programs through applied research projects using the latest genomic technology."

Professor Bruce Whitelaw, Deputy Director and Head of the Division of Developmental Biology at The Roslin Institute, said "We are excited about building on our long-term relationship with Landcatch through establishing this strategic partnership. Working with Hendrix Genetics across a number of commercial species offers exciting opportunities for the science that Roslin pioneers."

Dr Ross Houston, a group leader in aquaculture genetics at Roslin, said "This is an exciting development which will allow us to build on past successes with Hendrix Genetics Aquaculture, and facilitate new projects to improve disease resistance in salmon and other species through selective breeding." Dr Alastair Hamilton, senior scientist at Hendrix Genetics, will split his time between the Roslin Institute and the Hendrix Genetics as part of this partnership.

The Roslin Institute receives strategic funding from the Biotechnology andBiological Sciences Research Council.



Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

23/08/2016: Rutgers Aquaculture Innovation Centre switches to vibratory screening of oysters

by Kason Kek-Gardner, NJ Aquaculture Innovation Centre, Rutgers University

Seed oyster production at The New Jersey Aquaculture Innovation Centre at Rutgers University (AIC) is a large-scale operation by any measure. The 2046 sq m facility next to the Cape May Canal in Cape May, NJ, produces disease-resistant, fast-growing seed oysters for commercial grow-out, research, and restoration of native oyster beds. 



www.rutgers.edu
Annual production is more than 10 million seed oysters to meet customer specifications, in particular those of East Coast commercial oyster producers.

Sorting by size for counting and redistribution in the "nursery" is a frequent and essential operation in the seed oyster production cycle. Originally, sorting with a 0.6 X 0.6 m hand-held screener was a daunting task, according to Matt Neuman, lead researcher and technician for hatchery production at the AIC. "It took all day for a three- or four-man crew to complete each round of sorting," he explains.


 "And the added weight of seawater mixed with the product took a huge toll on everyone's shoulders."
 
The search for a ‘better way’ led to replacing manual screening with a dramatically more productive, mechanical 762 mm diameter Vibroscreen™ circular vibratory screener manufactured by Kason Corporation. With one operator now completing each day's sorting in less than two hours, the equipment paid for itself in the first season.

Aquaculture innovation at Rutgers


Farm raised oysters 
As the leading research and education hub for New Jersey's aquaculture community, the AIC studies and teaches methods of commercially raising seafood, benefiting a wide range of stakeholders – from aquaculture entrepreneurs and restoration specialists, to governmental resource managers and non-governmental organisations, to the fishing industry.

Among AIC’s projects is mass culturing of micro-algae using algal photo-bioreactors to increase yields of biochemical compounds with high potential value for food and pharmaceutical applications, as well as for shellfish (i.e., oysters) cultured for human consumption.

Seed oyster production: mimicking and accelerating nature

The Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) is among the shellfish species successfully cultured at the AIC using a micro-algae diet. The facility has been producing seed oysters from this strain since 2008. Seed oysters are small oysters, about 2–25 mm long, provided primarily to oyster growers for the half-shell market. They are also used to restore natural oyster populations or natural ecosystems, and for research. 

While natural oyster populations in the Delaware Bay spawn in late June or early July, at the AIC broodstock (adult oysters which produce baby oysters) are moved into temperature-controlled tanks in January, given plenty of microalgae food, and are ready to reproduce by late February. Fertilised eggs become microscopic oyster larvae, which are raised in filtered, sterilised seawater in 5 678 litre culture tanks. After two to three weeks, the larvae metamorphose into juvenile oysters called "spat."


Read the full article HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news